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| | |-+  "Where is the airport" KMBO to KMEI VFR trip with ATC COMS - Video
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Author Topic: "Where is the airport" KMBO to KMEI VFR trip with ATC COMS - Video  (Read 6687 times)
beechsundowner
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« on: July 07, 2011, 06:11:36 PM »

This has to be right up there with the worst forward visibility flight in VFR conditions I ever encountered.



Not mentioned in the audio, I was a hairs breadth away from asking for an ILS approach in supposedly VFR conditions. 

Video accurately depicts view outside, there simply was no forward visibility, only straight below could I see ground.

As you will see in the video ATC folks were awesome working with me!!! 

KJAN approach, Memphis center, Meridian approach and tower in the video.




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beechsundowner
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« Reply #1 on: July 10, 2011, 12:21:10 PM »

Picking up IFR clearance using iPad - Video

Lesson learned...  Practice writing clearances on iPad before getting in plane with iPad. 



I had a simple clearance and found it rather cumbersome. One may want to invest in some type of stylus as fat fingers do not go far for long clearances.

Wing wag at the end of video was me waving to my wife as I overflew my house smiley

Memphis ground, tower departure, center and KJAN approach facilities in this video.
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Jason
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« Reply #2 on: July 10, 2011, 03:15:27 PM »

Picking up IFR clearance using iPad - Video

Lesson learned...  Practice writing clearances on iPad before getting in plane with iPad. 



I had a simple clearance and found it rather cumbersome. One may want to invest in some type of stylus as fat fingers do not go far for long clearances.

I have had the same experience.  I pretty much do all of my flight planning on the iPad but print out my flight plans (on fltplan.com) and copy down my clearance on that via pen.  I have found it's much easier to read and write the clearance on paper.

Best,
Jason
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deputy66
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« Reply #3 on: July 11, 2011, 10:47:01 AM »

i don't want to be a "downer" but the responsibility to maintain VFR is yours as a pilot, not the controller.  If you are in conditions that are not conducive to visual conditions, then you need to remove yourself from those conditions, or declare you are not in visual conditions and request instruments.
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jmin152
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« Reply #4 on: November 23, 2011, 03:46:28 PM »

deputy66 is right on. They are not at all in VFR and it is the PIC's choice to be there. First, you can see the front coming in from the left side of the runway. It's coming in like a wedge, as he notes the HUGE temp drop after only climbing 3000. A METAR provides current information, but I know one look at the TAF or any forecast will show IFR and a ceiling of 1000 or less in ten minutes.
Very interesting to see how they respond to IFR conditions.
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BLKPILOT1
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« Reply #5 on: May 12, 2012, 07:03:13 AM »

Excellent post. Lot of training information on VFR. 
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N9rmg
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« Reply #6 on: May 27, 2012, 11:21:44 PM »

Great video! Incredible find guys!  grin
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StuSEL
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« Reply #7 on: May 30, 2012, 02:54:33 AM »

deputy66 is right on. They are not at all in VFR and it is the PIC's choice to be there. First, you can see the front coming in from the left side of the runway. It's coming in like a wedge, as he notes the HUGE temp drop after only climbing 3000. A METAR provides current information, but I know one look at the TAF or any forecast will show IFR and a ceiling of 1000 or less in ten minutes.
Very interesting to see how they respond to IFR conditions.
Not to be argumentative, but it's hard to judge whether or not they are in IMC based on the forward view of the cockpit camera, whose recorded view is largely obstructed by the engine in that aircraft. If there were an overcast ceiling, and your view of anything below the engine cowling was obscured, you might think the same thing.

The pilot in the video is beechsundowner; it's his video. There is visually a huge difference between great VFR and marginal VFR, but both are perfectly legal.
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CFI ASEL
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WilliamJSS
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« Reply #8 on: June 17, 2012, 11:51:39 AM »

Weather or not it was true VFR or not, very nice, stayed cool, were safe, great awareness, and you got those wheels rolling.
Very good video, and very educational for pilots who may not ever get to see that until they are in it for the first time.

My 4th solo I caught myself in the same situation, only from a fast moving squall moving in off the coast, took everyone by surprise. I though, a extreme novice turned tail and took myself out of that area, and set myself up with Charlie for KJAX and waited it out.

Very nice.
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InterpreDemon
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« Reply #9 on: June 18, 2012, 07:37:09 PM »

Well, you never know when those kinds of things can sneak up on you. Once my chariot was in for repair and I wanted to go down to a little strip outside Philly (New Garden, N57) to pick up my daughter for the weekend. My FBO at HPN asked me to take an Arrow off the line that had a suspect DG on the squawk sheet to confirm the observation of the prior pilot(s). This was not unusual... they gave me a discounted rate in exchange for my opinions or diagnostics, though of course I declined any such offers if they related to the power plant, such as "low oil pressure", "prop regulator hunting", "misfiring at cruise" or "engine cuts out during climb", etc.

Anyway, it was a beautiful day and as three out of four of my hours were generally at night I decided to swing down past Lady Liberty for the first time in years and then dog-leg over, skirting Maguire AFB and resuming course. It was around noon with the sun dead above and when I got down around Old Bridge in the course of a few minutes the forward haze became MVFR at best, right about the time I needed to get back on the gauges due to less familiar ground references, make that right turn to avoid McGuire and yeah, I needed to check out that DG just in case I decided to fly back later that night. All strictly routine.

So I dialed in Yardley and Solberg, got a fix, threw in a few degrees WCA and set up my track to the west. I kept cross-checking that DG with the compass and sure enough it appeared whackey. Good vacuum, horizon behaving, just gradually precessing or something. Fine, on with the eye patch and follow the compass. Problem is, I still couldn't maintain a track, and without any outside horizon or sun angle there was no directional reference, either. So I decided that the compass simply must be FUBAR,  started tracking with just the turn&bank, which didn't care about vacuum, and it appeared that straight & level was still working in the Twilight Zone after all. So, the patch came off the DG, subsequently confirmed to be just fine, and a dirty sock from my chart/underwear bag went over the compass for the duration.

All things being equal, I considered that haze to have been the most dangerous condition I had ever flown in, which takes in quite a few conditions, far preferring to be in solid IMC with others following the same rules and the shepherds on the ground watching over us, or even over dark, moonless, wastelands or water where at least I can see the anti-collision lights of my brethren. But that haze on a busy Saturday when others could have me bore-sighted, and all of us have had that happen to us in far better conditions at one time or another, was definitely a sobering experience. At the very least, flight following service is essential as well as all the instruments you are competent to use.

The epilogue to the story is that when I got back that afternoon and proudly announced my keen analysis and diagnosis to the manager, their A&P walked in and said, "Yeah, I haven't been able to set the compass card for a while and I've been meaning to get that one demagnetized. You wanna ferry it up there for us?"
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