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Author Topic: A320 grounds left wing during aborted crosswind landing in Hamburg today  (Read 60127 times)
kaktak1
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« Reply #15 on: March 03, 2008, 10:08:18 PM »

going to have to agree with zenwick a little. When I first saw it, it looked unstable.  But then again it could be the camera angle.  So me personally, it looked unstable if the camera was at a correct angle, which I doubt.  But at least they made it down fine after the Go-around.
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If black boxes survive air crashes — why don't they make the whole plane out of that stuff?
cessna157
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« Reply #16 on: March 03, 2008, 10:26:06 PM »

What part of it does not appear to be stable?

Upon further review, they may be a little bit high, as it appears they might have touched down a little long.  But from that camera angle, it is hard to tell.

But otherwise, it appears as a stable approach.  They look configured, on centerline, thrust up, etc.....
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RedOct
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« Reply #17 on: March 03, 2008, 10:50:40 PM »

I hate to disagree, but what you have is a very typical crosswind approach. You could have as many as 10% of the air traffic diverted each day if pilots avoid situations such as this one.

I still think it's a relatively inexperienced crew, which spends a little too much time perfectly aligning the plane with the runway by applying a hard left rudder. Right wing lifted up because they put it straight into the crosswind. A perfect alignment isn't necessary in this situation. A car or even cessna might roll on it's side if put it down like this, but remember this is an airliner (each wing has independently manuverable control surfaces for balance). They should have (1) put the left wheel down (they had an opportunity), immediately followed by (2) yawing the nose to left, immediately followed by (3) engaging partial spoilers on right wing to keep it or force it down which would have touched down the right wheel.

Stick on fly-by-wire A321 serves the same function as yoke, i.e. control of ailerons, elevators and rudder.

Plane is high because they are still pushing the throtle forward to try and fight the wind with their speed, an unintended consequence (by product) of which is that they are high.

They should have tried again, but the wing strike left them too scared. Hamburg is a busy airport, yet you don't have another remarkable video to go with this. Case closed.
« Last Edit: March 03, 2008, 11:20:11 PM by RedOct » Logged
KASWspotter
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« Reply #18 on: March 04, 2008, 02:38:10 AM »

Quote
Stick on fly-by-wire A321 serves the same function as yoke, i.e. control of ailerons, elevators and rudder.

On what? Flight simulator maybe. Didnt know it controlled rudder movement.

Quote
Plane is high because they are still pushing the throtle forward to try and fight the wind with their speed, an unintended consequence (by product) of which is that they are high.

And how would you know this? Inside information? Flight sim again? By the way it was a 320. I take it you arent that familiar with Airbus systems. You arent juking the throttles back and forth like you would on a Boeing product to maintain airspeed. The throttles have only a couple settings and the rest is computer controlled.

Quote
They should have tried again, but the wing strike left them too scared. Hamburg is a busy airport, yet you don't have another remarkable video to go with this. Case closed.

Again nonsense. Ok forget they had the wingstrike. They should attempt another touchdown more than halfway down the runway after almost going off the left side with the wind blowing them all over the place? Is that what you are saying? I think you need to have some facts before posting. CASE CLOSED.
« Last Edit: March 04, 2008, 02:40:34 AM by KASWspotter » Logged
mhawke
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« Reply #19 on: March 04, 2008, 06:44:27 AM »


 They should have (1) put the left wheel down (they had an opportunity), immediately followed by (2) yawing the nose to left, immediately followed by (3) engaging partial spoilers on right wing to keep it or force it down which would have touched down the right wheel.

Stick on fly-by-wire A321 serves the same function as yoke, i.e. control of ailerons, elevators and rudder.

They should have tried again, but the wing strike left them too scared. Hamburg is a busy airport, yet you don't have another remarkable video to go with this. Case closed.

Hope I never fly in a plane where you are the pilot.  Stick does not control rudder, unless you are flying flight sim with auto rudder turned on.

Your method of cross wind landing would likely results in what happened here, or worse.  Just before touchdown at flare, rudder is applied to aligne plane with runway and the upwind wing is lowered to prevent incoming wind from lifting it and compensate for cross wind.  Most wing tip strikes on cross wind landings are due to the pilot overcompensating with the upwind wing. (and its ussually the upwind wingtip that strikes)

An added benefit here (sarcasm) is the fly-by wire system on the airbus.  My understanding is that the system tends to dampen the roll input of the pilot, especially if it is applied immediately after a yaw input..

I would rate it as pilot error. There was too much left rudder, and the crew failed to utilize partial spoilers on the right wing to force it down. See Korean Airline crew successfully land a 747 in extreme crosswind - notice the partial spoilers engaged on right wing to force it down.

Partial spoiler input on the 747 is automatic based on amount of roll input from the pilot.  The pilot on that 747 did not 'flip the lever' to input some spoiler.  The 747 is designed to do that automatically during slow speed as an aid to the pilot because of the size of the airlerons.  The 747 has two sets of airlerons, one for low speed, one for high speed, and additional it uses the spoilers during low speed flight with high input.
« Last Edit: March 04, 2008, 06:46:11 AM by mhawke » Logged
RedOct
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« Reply #20 on: March 04, 2008, 08:06:41 AM »

My typo. Just as yoke controls pitch and bank, so does the stick. Yaw is of course controlled by pedals.

I would have landed slightly on left side of the runway and after both rear gears touched down, I would have yawed lto the left for alignment, with spoliers fully engaged, before the front wheel touched down.



Do I really need to spell out that I meant going around the pattern and making another attempt at landing.

Now, take a loot at this A321.
« Last Edit: March 04, 2008, 11:03:35 AM by RedOct » Logged
George747
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« Reply #21 on: March 04, 2008, 02:48:52 PM »

My first post on this forum. Here are some comments about the comments
:
>>I would rate it as pilot error. There was too much left rudder, and the crew failed to utilize partial spoilers on the right wing to force it down<<
From the video it appears to me the rudder input was fine.  It aligned the acft with the runway in the flare and, there is no independent control to activate the spoilers on an individual wing. It is a function of the aileron input on the "up" aileron side.

>>They should have (1) put the left wheel down (they had an opportunity), immediately followed by (2) yawing the nose to left, immediately followed by (3) engaging partial spoilers on right wing to keep it or force it down which would have touched down the right wheel.<<
(1) The proper technique is to touchdown on the upwind main gear during a crosswind landing.
(2) The nose was yawed to the left with the rudder and the acft appeared aligned with the rwy.
(3) see previous reply

>>Hope I never fly in a plane where you are the pilot.  Stick does not control rudder, unless you are flying flight sim with auto rudder turned on.<<
I have no clue about flight sim but on the bus the rudder does get an input when aileron is applied.  It helps with the coordinating the turn.

<<Plane is high because they are still pushing the throtle forward to try and fight the wind with their speed, an unintended consequence (by product) of which is that they are high.>>
Looking at the video they don't appear high.  The photos show them right in the runway touchdown zone.


<<And how would you know this? Inside information? Flight sim again? By the way it was a 320. I take it you arent that familiar with Airbus systems. You arent juking the throttles back and forth like you would on a Boeing product to maintain airspeed. The throttles have only a couple settings and the rest is computer controlled.>>

Actually the bus throttles can be flown just like a Boeing; push forward, engines produce more thrust; pull back and engines produce less. In the auto-throttle mode they are stationary.

<<Im not a pilot; like a lot of you....  But didn't this jet Stall - just before they gunned the engines and take off? >>

It certainly did not stall else it would't have been able to abort the landing.  For an approach like this with the wind being so strong the crew would have been carring some extra airspeed to compensate for it.  They would have been well above the stall speed.  In fact, the bus' computers would have computed an airspeed to keep their groundspeed constant.  That's what's good about the bus.
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Jason
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« Reply #22 on: March 04, 2008, 03:42:57 PM »

I think you need to have some facts before posting. CASE CLOSED.

I understand your frustration, but lets please keep this a mature discussion about the issue at hand.  There is plenty of time for both of you to present your different opinions.  Perhaps requesting an explanation of the ideas presented would result in a more educational discussion.

Respectfully,
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eppy
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« Reply #23 on: March 04, 2008, 03:43:12 PM »

Made it to CNN today

Finally made to BBC website front page and my local newspaper today - 4 days after I posted it here! Looks like the Internet has overtaken traditional media when it comes to timeliness.

I had to cringe at the errors in my newspaper (UK London 'Metro') this morning. The caption from one still of the video said that the plane was "trying to land in 250 km/h (155 MPH) winds" Another caption stated "Tyres touch down but it takes off again".

Its interesting how almost every time I read a newspaper article in which I have independent information I find factual errors i the newspaper article

(Please forgive this slightly off-topic thread).
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RedOct
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« Reply #24 on: March 04, 2008, 04:10:46 PM »

Oh, by no means did I mean thread closed by case closed. It was a way of emphasizing my point, similar to saying "period" at the end of a sentence.

The last time I played on a flight simulator was back when they used keyboards. I have never used a game stick.

Plane is high (period, this time), unless you have it's glide slope in front, you can't convince any differently.
« Last Edit: March 04, 2008, 04:18:28 PM by RedOct » Logged
RedOct
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« Reply #25 on: March 04, 2008, 07:57:56 PM »

Now, please see this crosswind landing. Point being that plane did not need to be perfectly aligned with the run way especially in this 90 degree crosswind. Touch down both rear landing gears and then yaw to align the nose with runway.

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George747
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« Reply #26 on: March 04, 2008, 10:37:57 PM »

I may be wrong but I understand the video was taken on rwy 23 but the still photo looks like rwy 33.
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RedOct
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« Reply #27 on: March 04, 2008, 11:14:43 PM »

Video provides no runway info, but according to still, runway is 15/33.
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Aardvark
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« Reply #28 on: March 05, 2008, 12:14:32 AM »

Looked like a perfect xwind landing to me. Looks like they got a strong gust as worst possible time. I think pilots did a good job getting it back.

Even if you blame it on pilot error, they took the rright steps to correct it and all turned out well.
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koni
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« Reply #29 on: March 05, 2008, 02:21:43 AM »

Video provides no runway info, but according to still, runway is 15/33.
It was runway 23. The final landing was on runway 33 then!
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