Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?
December 22, 2014, 08:34:53 AM
Home Help Login Register      
News: NEW Follow LiveATC updates on Twitter and Facebook


+  LiveATC Discussion Forums
|-+  Air Traffic Monitoring
| |-+  Aviation Audio Clips (Moderators: dave, RonR)
| | |-+  AAL1473 - MD82 - KPBI - Aug 07, 2009 - Engine Failure
« previous next »
Pages: [1] 2 Go Down Print
Author Topic: AAL1473 - MD82 - KPBI - Aug 07, 2009 - Engine Failure  (Read 10014 times)
kea001
Guest
« on: August 07, 2009, 12:24:08 PM »

An American Airlines McDonnell Douglas MD-82, flight AA-1473 from West Palm Beach,FL to Dallas Ft. Worth,TX (USA) with 141 people on board, had just departed runway 09R, when the crew declared emergency reporting the failure of the left hand engine. The aircraft was cleared for an immediate return to runway 27R winds calm and landed safely about 10 minutes after liftoff.

Passengers said, they heard a loud noise immediately after liftoff, then the captain announced to prepare for an emergency landing.

http://www.avherald.com/h?article=41de2fea&opt=1
Logged
joeyb747
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1585


Nothing Like A 747!


« Reply #1 on: August 12, 2009, 10:13:27 PM »

Not another one...not a good year for American Mad Dogs!

If I remember correctly, isn't that four MD-80s' that have had engine issues this year?

This one. One out of DCA. One out of LGA. One in Texas.

And then the one that was struck by lightning.
« Last Edit: August 12, 2009, 10:19:55 PM by joeyb747 » Logged

Aircraft Mechanic
kea001
Guest
« Reply #2 on: August 12, 2009, 10:43:26 PM »

Hmmmmmm. Let's see...... shocked
Italics for foreign incidents. Haven't separated out engine failures. This list is too interesting.

MD-8*

  • MD82 near Johannesburg on Aug 10th 2009, engine shut down inflight
  • American MD82 near West Palm Beach on Aug 7th 2009, engine failure
  • Mahan MD82 near Tehran on Jul 26th 2009, cabin fire alert
  • American MD82 near Austin on Jul 24th 2009, engine fire alert
  • American MD83 at Orlando on Jul 15th 2009, pressurization problem twice
  • Delta Airlines MD88 near Jacksonville on Jul 7th 2009, smoke in cockpit
  • American MD83 near Lafayette on Jul 6th 2009, smoke in cabin
  • Delta MD88 at West Palm Beach on Jul 5th 2009, unsafe gear
  • Meridiana MD82 near Olbia on Jun 28th 2009, air conditioning problems
  • Allegiant MD82 at Allentown on Jun 27th 2009, engine failure due to tyre
  • Austral MD88 at Santiago del Estero on Jun 26th 2009, unsafe nose gear
  • Falcon Air Express MD83 at Aruba on Jun 22nd 2009, APU smoke in cabin
  • Allegiant MD83 near Fresno on Jun 21st 2009, engine failure
  • American MD83 at Washington on Jun 15th 2009, engine failure
  • American MD83 near Palm Springs on Jun 12th 2009, APU failure enroute
  • American MD83 near Seattle on Jun 11th 2009, engine trouble
  • Meridiana MD82 near Olbia on Jun 7th 2009, radar failure
  • American B763 and MD82 at Chicago on Jun 1st 2009, near collision
  • Andes MD82 near Bahia Blanca on May 22nd 2009, engine shut down in flight
  • Austral MD83 at Buenos Aires on May 20th 2009, smoke in cabin prompts evacuation
  • Allegiant MD83 near Las Vegas on May 18th 2009, smoke in cockpit
  • Alitalia MD82 at Rome on May 9th 2009, burst tyre on takeoff, tyre fragments ingested by engine
  • Meridiana MD83 at Catania on May 7th 2009, blew tyres in a pothole on runway
  • Allegiant MD83 near Las Vegas on Apr 26th 2009, engine failure
  • American MD82 near Tallahassee on Apr 25th 2009, mechanical trouble
  • JAL MD81 at Osaka on Apr 22nd 2009, wing tip strike on landing
  • Alitalia MD82 at Reggio Calabria on Apr 16th 2009, engine failure
  • SAS MD82 at Gdansk on Apr 15th 2009, tail strike on takeoff
  • American MD83 near Omaha on Mar 30th 2009, loss of pressurization
  • American MD82 at San Diego on Mar 29th 2009, smoke in cockpit
  • Aerolineas Argentinas MD88 at Trelew on Mar 25th 2009, smoke in cabin prompts evacuation
  • Delta Airlines MD88 near Guadalajara on Mar 24th 2009, unsafe gear after takeoff
  • Delta Airlines MD88 at Atlanta on Mar 14th 2009, blew two tyres
  • American MD82 near Houston on Mar 13th 2009, lightning strike, hole in the fuselage
  • American MD83 at New York on Mar 11th 2009, uncontained engine failure
  • American MD82 at Austin on Mar 9th 2009, engine failure on takeoff
  • 1time MD83 near Bloemfontein on Feb 26th 2009, oil filter problem
  • Air Burkina MD87 at Cotonou on Feb 15th 2009, serious jolts before landing and a dual birdstrike on Feb 17th
  • American MD82 near Abilene on Feb 10th 2009, generator failure
  • SAS MD81 at Frankfurt on Feb 6th 2009, unsafe gear indication
  • Austral MD88 at Tucuman on Feb 2nd 2009, rejected takeoff
  • 1Time MD82 at Port Elizabeth on Jan 12th 2009, engine failure
  • Andes MD82 near Ponta Pora on Jan 12th 2009, navigation breakdown, loss of situational awareness

http://www.avherald.com/h?search_term=md-8&opt=1&dosearch=1&search.x=18&search.y=7

But of course, statistically, it still may be safer than other models.
« Last Edit: August 12, 2009, 10:55:05 PM by kea001 » Logged
joeyb747
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1585


Nothing Like A 747!


« Reply #3 on: August 13, 2009, 06:08:20 PM »

Wow...  undecided
Logged

Aircraft Mechanic
Mittelos Bioscience
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 10


« Reply #4 on: August 15, 2009, 11:19:07 PM »

American has a huge fleet of these, it'll take years to replace them....should they hurry up?
Logged
fholbert
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 144



WWW
« Reply #5 on: August 15, 2009, 11:21:04 PM »

American has a huge fleet of these, it'll take years to replace them....should they hurry up?
A couple of 717's too.
Logged

Frank Holbert
http://160knots.com
otto_pilot
Jr. Member
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 64



« Reply #6 on: August 16, 2009, 02:40:42 AM »

http://www.airfleets.net/ageflotte/American%20Airlines.htm
So this is Americans MD 80's fleet age; Americans average fleet age is 18.9 years on the MD 80's. That's is older than I am. The main issue is the gas Jet A isn't cheap and the less the plane uses the better. Also passenger comfort has been spoken of its not roomie enough and "they lack the latest gadgets." (business week). Well the issue is where to get the planes to replace them. European  discount airlines along with air carriers from Asia have ordered many many planes. That being said Boeing for example in 2008 had 662 orders while delivering 375.  The 42 Boeing 787 dreamliners on order wont be there 2012. The 737-800 they are "replacing" the MD-80s with are getting there now but slowly 29 this year 39 next. By 2016 they will have 87 737. Not close the 300 or so mad dogs still flying. For American the matter is not why to replace the workhouse of its fleet; but how will they retire them all before the fleet age has reached an excessive number of years. Simply put American is doing its best to find an answer; it knows of the problem but a solution is not as easy as one thinks. Until they retire them fuel efficiency passenger comfort will all be a concern for the airline as the number of on time MD 80 flights continue to drop. The plane is safe statically but the greater issue is its outdated standing with today's fuel efficiency and passenger comfort expectations. From what i found American had 1 717 from trans world which they operated from 2001 to 2003. this is just what i found on the subject.......if anything in here seems off to you please point it out because i was intrigued by thread and want to know if what i found is essentially right. 
thanks
Anthony
Logged

tower: right delta ground point niner
pilot: Uh tower did you mean to say ground point 8 or do you want us to try them on point 9.
tower: Oh yea point 8 would work better, wouldnt it
Mittelos Bioscience
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 10


« Reply #7 on: August 16, 2009, 03:39:27 PM »

Interesting post Anthony. I didn't realize one of the problems was on the supply side. Could they rework their network and put in more short haul flights operating smaller craft (RJs, etc.) leaving the 737s for the more critical routes? How is the supply of the smaller commuter jets?
Logged
mikenftsmith
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 23


« Reply #8 on: August 16, 2009, 06:48:50 PM »

Look at Northwest and the age of their DC9...if its paid off they will fly for many,many years.
Logged
otto_pilot
Jr. Member
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 64



« Reply #9 on: August 16, 2009, 09:16:25 PM »

Well The CRJ program is backed up in excess of 100 aircraft right now. I don't believe you will see American dump  some of the smaller 73 or mad dog routes to the regional airlines at this time. Most short flights will be on a regional unless demand requires larger aircraft. I no at the KMDT (Harrisburg international airport) is all regionals except a US Airways flight from Charlotte. Demand on that flight requires a 737 not an rj or a dash. Also mainline pilots are apprehensive about giving more flying to the regionals. Bigger rjs and more routes wouldn't really sit well with the mainline guys is my bet. My bet is get used to the fully paid off American airlines MD 80's they will stay around for a long time.   
Logged

tower: right delta ground point niner
pilot: Uh tower did you mean to say ground point 8 or do you want us to try them on point 9.
tower: Oh yea point 8 would work better, wouldnt it
joeyb747
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1585


Nothing Like A 747!


« Reply #10 on: August 17, 2009, 09:33:24 PM »

American has a huge fleet of these, it'll take years to replace them....should they hurry up?
A couple of 717's too.

Beg to differ with you...

http://www.airfleets.net/flottecie/American%20Airlines.htm

American operated the B717 for a very short time after the TWA merger, but changed lease terms to end sooner. The fleet only held 28 birds at it's strongest. In fact, no B717 ever wore full American Airlines colors. Most, like N2427A pictured below wore American colors and TWA titles.

http://www.airliners.net/photo/TWA-Airlines-(American/Boeing-717-231/0227521/L/&sid=7f99cb80901b50a760361ae3dfc4dbb3

See the chart I linked to here:

http://www.airfleets.net/flottecie/American%20Airlines-history-b717.htm

All B717 reg numbers are listed here. Mostly TWA...note the "Remarks"...all to other airlines, none retainted by American.

Also this: As anthonychibnikC172 pointed out, average fleet age for American is 15.6 years old, and the MD-80 in particular is 18.9 years.

http://www.airfleets.net/ageflotte/American%20Airlines.htm
« Last Edit: August 17, 2009, 09:56:07 PM by joeyb747 » Logged

Aircraft Mechanic
joeyb747
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1585


Nothing Like A 747!


« Reply #11 on: August 17, 2009, 09:41:49 PM »

Look at Northwest and the age of their DC9...if its paid off they will fly for many,many years.

In fact, Delta plans on operating them for a long while yet, having already repainted most of them!
Read the caption to this pic:

http://www.airliners.net/photo/Delta-Air-Lines/McDonnell-Douglas-DC-9-51/1560999/L/&sid=003830c670e29faec5e8325b21756084
Logged

Aircraft Mechanic
otto_pilot
Jr. Member
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 64



« Reply #12 on: August 17, 2009, 10:19:28 PM »

joey you are right about the 717's but my question to you is how long until they mad dogs are gone being they are paid off. I'm betting in limited use for many years to come. if i had to bet a 25 plus average age.
Logged

tower: right delta ground point niner
pilot: Uh tower did you mean to say ground point 8 or do you want us to try them on point 9.
tower: Oh yea point 8 would work better, wouldnt it
joeyb747
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1585


Nothing Like A 747!


« Reply #13 on: August 18, 2009, 06:14:31 AM »

joey you are right about the 717's but my question to you is how long until they mad dogs are gone being they are paid off. I'm betting in limited use for many years to come. if i had to bet a 25 plus average age.

It's more a question of how busy the fleet is. If American can slow down it's MD-80 fleet, they will be around for a long while yet. Airframe life is based on a combination of hours aloft, cycles, and years. Once an airframe has met it's time limits, that's it for it. The aircraft will be W.D.U. and scrapped. That is referred to as being "timed out". I would agree that the average age of an MD-80 when they are W.D.U. will probably be around 25, just to put a number on it.
« Last Edit: August 18, 2009, 09:49:54 PM by joeyb747 » Logged

Aircraft Mechanic
otto_pilot
Jr. Member
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 64



« Reply #14 on: August 18, 2009, 07:49:59 PM »

You no i did no that about the cycles; i forgot about it though. Didnt no you could time a plane out. very nice info....good to know.
Thanks anthony
Logged

tower: right delta ground point niner
pilot: Uh tower did you mean to say ground point 8 or do you want us to try them on point 9.
tower: Oh yea point 8 would work better, wouldnt it
Pages: [1] 2 Go Up Print 
« previous next »
Jump to:  


Login with username, password and session length

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.20 | SMF © 2011, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!