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Author Topic: Air Pacific FJ810 Go Around LAX  (Read 14349 times)
PRFlyer
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« on: July 01, 2013, 09:20:35 PM »

Listen to when ATC gave the OK to go around (around 11s point). There is a chorus in the background for the go-around.
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geoffeg
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PPL


« Reply #1 on: July 01, 2013, 10:09:47 PM »

I wonder if this is a standard practice at towered airports. When there's a go around, is it announced to the rest of the tower to alert everyone of a go-around?
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tyketto
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« Reply #2 on: July 02, 2013, 02:20:18 PM »

I wonder if this is a standard practice at towered airports. When there's a go around, is it announced to the rest of the tower to alert everyone of a go-around?

Depends. It generally helps to announce it, especially if the reason for it is important enough for the others coming in on final. For example, what if there were a loss of 15kts on short final? That would be important for the others to know so they can handle it accordingly. FOD on the runway? That could make the next 3 - 4 aircraft go around until airport maintenance gets the debris off the runway, if not make them sidestep to a parallel runway (if available).

It could have been that this aircraft was too high on final and decided it was better to go around than to touch down further down the field, inviting a problem (see the St. Barts accident footage, or the RedWings TU-204 incident on youtube).

This is also important to the departures as they'd incur the short delay in in trail spacing because the go around would be essentially treated as a departure.

So many different reasons, but it doesn't hurt to alert the others.

BL.
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Hollis
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« Reply #3 on: July 03, 2013, 04:06:36 PM »

Then again, slow down or go around. KBOS 7/02/13.
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oktalist
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« Reply #4 on: July 04, 2013, 09:33:37 AM »

BBC Airport Live episode 3 caught some good footage of a Lufthansa A320 go-around from inside Heathrow tower. It's available on Youtube (skip to 45:30 for the go-around, but the whole series is generally quite interesting).

The tower controller working arrivals announces "going around" to his colleagues, and some kind of alarm is activated. A few seconds later you can hear some coordination "Jordanian is a Dover" referring to RJA112 who is departing on the Dover SID, a departure procedure which comes rather close to the published missed approach procedure. You can catch a couple of shots of the radar display where you can see the relative positions of the Lufthansa and the Jordanian.
« Last Edit: July 04, 2013, 12:01:32 PM by oktalist » Logged
w0x0f
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« Reply #5 on: July 04, 2013, 04:52:45 PM »

It has been standard in the towers I have worked with more than one local controller to announce go arounds throughout the tower.  The local controllers are working independently due to procedures that establish standard separation without coordination.

Obviously, go arounds are not standard, and usually do not conform with the procedures established that allow the multiple local controllers to work independently.  For example, when the local controller responsible for only arrivals to one runway has a go around, he essentially now has a departure on his hands.  It's important to coordinate with the local controller who has responsibility for the other departures off another runway.  The BBC clip was an excellent example of this scenario.

For towers with one local, there may be reason to call out a go around if there is a tower cab coordinator who would need to coordinate for local if he was too busy to do it himself.  The call outs in these examples are for the benefit of the other controllers, not the pilots.  We just happened to catch the call out in the background on the local controller's transmission.  Like tyketto said, if the reason was for wind shear or FOD then a general transmission would be made to inform the approaching aircraft. 

w0x0f 
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chrisghb
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« Reply #6 on: July 07, 2013, 08:20:31 PM »

Is this old ATC audio, I was on an Air Pacific "go around" into LAX Jan 1st or 2nd, curious if this is the same audio or newer.

Thanks
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chrisghb
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« Reply #7 on: July 07, 2013, 08:26:35 PM »

Disregard my last post, after a 2nd listen my event was due to a "Runway Incursion", we were pretty low and I believe the tower indicated to the pilot (he said that they had over the PA) Does anyone where to find the data from these type of incidents?
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orlondo1
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« Reply #8 on: December 17, 2013, 10:55:20 PM »

This is a standard practice indeed. Every time we have a go-around, it is announced loudly in the tower cab. This notifies everybody that the a/c will be going around and all necessary coordination will begin. The FJI experienced an RA which means there was another a/c in close proximity and the TCAS advised the pilot to act. He was unable to descend and so he declared a missed approach. With the number of crossing paths we deal with for airborne a/c at LAX, we need to ensure that safety is never compromised and proper separation is always applied. We have a/c from the opposite complex crossing over the flight paths of departures, helos transitioning at 1500, and VFR fixed wing transitioning at 2000. A go around could put him right through a helicopter or previous cross over departure, not to mention if there's traffic @ 2500 transitioning VFR, he'd be leveling off of a fairly steep climb 500 ft below. It brings attention to the entire operation and ensures safety.
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swa4678
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« Reply #9 on: December 18, 2013, 02:07:19 PM »

=VFR fixed wing transitioning at 2000.
I was only aware of the miniroute transition @ 2500 (hence a missed app. altitude of 2000 until over the ocean); what VFR transitions do you have at 2000? (Or was that a typo?)
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B16NCM
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« Reply #10 on: December 20, 2013, 05:18:25 AM »

Its good to announce it, Mainly for the departure runway controller to react if needed. Some towers declare it like this mp3. or some have a button that when pressed gives out a bleeping noise that indicsates a go around.

Normally the Terminal controllers will also have the alarm going of when the button is pressed.
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