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Author Topic: ASH 7262 emergency evacuation at KSYR  (Read 6237 times)
Аэрофлот Jr.
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« on: October 29, 2008, 08:58:05 PM »

full coverage [taxing out to terminating of this incident] of Air Shuttle 7262 [United Express 7262 they were outbound syracuse to washington dulles]  edited by me , syracuse atc saw flame coming out of one of ash7262 [CRJ 200] 's engine , passengers all evacuated  and plane safely taxied back to the gate .  it will help u to follow better by looking at the airport diagram that i attached with the clip .   hope u like it .  smiley
« Last Edit: October 29, 2008, 09:02:46 PM by fpx2gwak » Logged

sincerely, Rae
cessna157
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« Reply #1 on: October 29, 2008, 10:39:17 PM »

A good catch.  Did this just happen today (Wednesday)?

The CRJ100/200 is known to shoot out some flames during an engine start with a delayed lightoff (700s and 900s do not do this unless one of the ignition systems is deferred).  It is never an issue as long as the engine starts (which is what causes the flame).  Basically, what happens, is the starter spins the engine up, at the correct point, fuel and ignition is introduced with the thrust lever.  Normally, the igniters inside the engine light the fuel within a second or 2.  But occasionally the igniters do not light the fuel immediately, and the fuel spray is shot out the back of the engine as a mist.  When the fuel does light inside the engine, the rest of this mist behind the airplane will light creating a large (10+ foot) fireball that sometimes engulfs the entire tail.  It is quite a sight to see, especially at night, and usually results in no damage.  I suspect that is what the ground controller saw, since that would be about the time they start their left engine.

It is odd that they say they "have smoke indications in the cabin" and evacuate the aircraft, except the pilots stay on board.  Flames out of the left engine would have no effect on smoke in the cabin, unless the crew would have started the engine, transferred the bleeds to the engine, and shut down the APU (which would be a VERY rare occurrence with this type of aircraft).

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KSYR-pjr
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« Reply #2 on: October 29, 2008, 11:16:07 PM »

A good catch.  Did this just happen today (Wednesday)?

It happened Tuesday evening around 6:00p Eastern.
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Regards, Peter
ATC Feed:  Syracuse (KSYR), NY
Аэрофлот Jr.
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« Reply #3 on: October 30, 2008, 07:08:05 AM »

A good catch.  Did this just happen today (Wednesday)?

The CRJ100/200 is known to shoot out some flames during an engine start with a delayed lightoff (700s and 900s do not do this unless one of the ignition systems is deferred).  It is never an issue as long as the engine starts (which is what causes the flame).  Basically, what happens, is the starter spins the engine up, at the correct point, fuel and ignition is introduced with the thrust lever.  Normally, the igniters inside the engine light the fuel within a second or 2.  But occasionally the igniters do not light the fuel immediately, and the fuel spray is shot out the back of the engine as a mist.  When the fuel does light inside the engine, the rest of this mist behind the airplane will light creating a large (10+ foot) fireball that sometimes engulfs the entire tail.  It is quite a sight to see, especially at night, and usually results in no damage.  I suspect that is what the ground controller saw, since that would be about the time they start their left engine.

It is odd that they say they "have smoke indications in the cabin" and evacuate the aircraft, except the pilots stay on board.  Flames out of the left engine would have no effect on smoke in the cabin, unless the crew would have started the engine, transferred the bleeds to the engine, and shut down the APU (which would be a VERY rare occurrence with this type of aircraft).



thats a good information .   thanks
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sincerely, Rae
Jason
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« Reply #4 on: October 30, 2008, 01:08:20 PM »

At what % N2 do you introduce fuel on the crj 100/200? Did Bombardier issue a service bulletin on this issue? I would think they would but perhaps it's one of those things you learn on IOE.
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bn2av8r
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« Reply #5 on: October 30, 2008, 11:15:30 PM »

20% N2 or > as long as the ITT is 120 degrees C or below
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Jason
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« Reply #6 on: October 31, 2008, 01:46:30 PM »

20% N2 or > as long as the ITT is 120 degrees C or below

Interesting.  It's considerably less on the Citation's I've flown (we use 8% N2 on the CJ3), but I would suspect the Pratt & Whitney as well as the Williams turbofans operate a little bit differently than the larger GE series.
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