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Author Topic: Controller only side of conversation emergency N10332  (Read 3151 times)
ridejumpfly
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« on: April 22, 2014, 09:34:48 PM »

PRC Phoenix approach feed. 0030-0100 23april. Starts at about 09:10. Sounds pretty gnarly. I'm on wifi on a flight so can't edit. If someone else could that would be great.
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dave
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« Reply #1 on: April 22, 2014, 09:42:37 PM »

Audio attached.  Hopefully they made it into Flagstaff.  They were 4 miles out when last in communication with Phoenix Approach - then they were handed off to Flagstaff Tower (no coverage there).
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JapsicanBoi
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« Reply #2 on: April 24, 2014, 12:25:02 AM »

They did land safely, it managed to be a complete loss of oil pressure. He managed to find the problem upon landing and all there was is a trail of oil all over the place, there was also a problem with the manifold pressure. The PIC shut down the engine in the air and made the emergency landing at flagstaff. The aircraft is still at flagstaff, there was also an aircraft following  N10332 just to make sure that he landed safely.
« Last Edit: April 24, 2014, 12:31:34 AM by JapsicanBoi » Logged
Col400HHR
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« Reply #3 on: May 25, 2014, 01:23:50 AM »

That was me in N10332, a Colombia/Cessna 400.  Coming out of turbulance at 14,500MSL I pushed the throttle to accelerate and no increase in manifold pressure resulted (turbocharges require oil pressure), that's when I noticed oil pressure was at bottom of white arc (12psi, normally 50).  Pulled throttle to near minimum and started Vg descent, called controller.  Subsequent review of G1000 datalogs shows oil pressure dropped 3minutes before I reacted, no announiator as wasn't in red arc yet.  Pressure continued to drop and was over mountainous and woody northern Arizona.  KFLG is at 7000MSL, so I had only 7,500ft of altittude above terrain (not counting peaks).

Didn't think I was going to make it to Sedona or Flagstaff so headed toward what looked like a salt flat, but it turned out to be large pond covered in algea, Mormon Lake, see map.  There were small roads and (i found out later via google maps, an abandon air strip).  I didn't like any of it. 

Oil pressure was very low but stable, so I decided to see how much power I had left.  I was able to get a bit of a climb and I could see the city of Flagstaff (wind pushing me north).  I could also see that there was serious terrain, woods, and no roads, but the aircraft was holding and I knew I'd be there in just a few minutes, so I decided better to land at an airport instead of around Mormon Lake with unknown landable terrain.

As we approached KFLG, we did see the "chase plane" that they had sent up, which was a welcome site.  Winds were high, 220@24 gusting 32 but landing 21 not much of a crosswind.  In fact, I didn't realize until just now that there was little crosswind, difficult to calculate difference between wind vector and runway heading when under that much stress.  All I knew at that point was runway in site and engine still spinning, I didn't give a hoot about crosswind - I was going to put that plane on the runway if the engine allowed.

After landing we taxied to the FBO with firetrucks in tow.  A fireman approached on foot and upon opening the door I said to him "I think I have an oil leak".  His eyes bulged and he said "Yeah, I think so".  He could see what I couldn't yet (see next post).

CAUSE: The starter assembly also contains a turbo-oil re-collection pump and a pulley at the end for the 3rd alternator (Thermawing).  That shaft sheared off resulting in loss of oil from 8 quarts down to 2 quarts (see next post).

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Col400HHR
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« Reply #4 on: May 25, 2014, 01:25:04 AM »

View from back/right of plane looking toward nosewheel.
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Col400HHR
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« Reply #5 on: May 25, 2014, 01:26:04 AM »

Cause, sheared shaft in starter assembly.  It should be sticking straight out at the same angle as the starter assembly it's coming out of, you can see it is only held in by the firewall.
« Last Edit: May 25, 2014, 01:31:06 AM by Col400HHR » Logged
Col400HHR
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« Reply #6 on: May 25, 2014, 01:38:25 AM »

My baby before I purchased it.
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InterpreDemon
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« Reply #7 on: May 25, 2014, 01:30:16 PM »

Very strange... I didn't know that rocket ships even used lubricating oil in their engines, I thought they just used their own fuel for lubrication and cooling. Hmmmm
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