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Author Topic: CRASH AEROPERU WITH CVR_603, FLIGHT DATA RECORDER  (Read 18723 times)
DaytonaAirport
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« Reply #15 on: June 17, 2009, 03:36:48 AM »

This was a interesting case that resulted in some policy changes.  Problem was they used grey tape to cover the static port so they could spray the plane down.  Then when the pilots preflighted the aircraft, which was at night, they did not notice the grey tape since it blended in.  Now procedure is to use bright reflective tape so it can't be missed.

Here is a pic of the static ports covered with the grey tape:

http://www.airdisaster.com/photos/ap603/13.shtml

Yes, but the tape has been washed off when the back of the plane followed the sinking of the front side.
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SntElmosFire
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« Reply #16 on: June 17, 2009, 05:58:44 AM »

Note to self; always listen to the co-pilot.  Had it been the co-pilot as PIC in this scenerio, things may have ended differently.  Reminds me of the JFK 757 which ran into wake-turb after takeoff from a 747.  the CVR records the co-pilot being uneasy with the spacing.  So when all yall become Big shot captains, dont forget that the co-pilot is usually right...except when he's not  sad
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DaytonaAirport
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« Reply #17 on: June 17, 2009, 07:49:01 PM »

Note to self; always listen to the co-pilot.  Had it been the co-pilot as PIC in this scenerio, things may have ended differently.  Reminds me of the JFK 757 which ran into wake-turb after takeoff from a 747.  the CVR records the co-pilot being uneasy with the spacing.  So when all yall become Big shot captains, dont forget that the co-pilot is usually right...except when he's not  sad
You mean the AA587 crash? The plane was an A300, not a 757.
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joeyb747
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Nothing Like A 747!


« Reply #18 on: June 17, 2009, 08:36:08 PM »

This was a interesting case that resulted in some policy changes.  Problem was they used grey tape to cover the static port so they could spray the plane down.  Then when the pilots preflighted the aircraft, which was at night, they did not notice the grey tape since it blended in.  Now procedure is to use bright reflective tape so it can't be missed.


Actually, it was another B757 crash a few months earlier that implemented the changes. In very eerily similar conditions, Birgenair 301,  a Rolls Royce RB-211-535E4 powered B757-225, reg # TC-GEN, crashed into the ocean off the cost of Puerto Plata, Domincan Republic on Feb 6, 1996, killing all 189 on board. There are reports that the static ports were covered with tape, causing erroneous readings in the cockpit.

From Wikipedia:
"After takeoff at 11:42 p.m the captain found that his air speed indicator (ASI) was not working properly, although the co-pilot's ASI was functional. While the plane was climbing to 4,700 feet (1,400 m), the captain's ASI indicated 350 knots, which triggered an autopilot reaction, increasing the pitch-up attitude and reducing power to lower the plane's airspeed. Investigations showed that the plane was actually travelling at 220 knots at the time. Both pilots became confused when the co-pilot's ASI read 200 knots (decreasing) while getting rudder ratio and Mach airspeed advisory warnings and a stick-shaker warning. The pilots concluded that both ASIs were malfunctioning. The autopilot, which received the captain's faulty ASI readings, was disconnected by the pilots and they gave full thrust. At 11:47 p.m., the Ground Proximity Warning System gave an audio warning, and eight seconds later the plane crashed into the Caribbean Sea. All 9 crew members and 180 passengers died."

The aircraft rolled over, and crashed, inverted, into the ocean. Findings from this crash had not reached Aeroperu yet, and the MX crew went about there business as usual, continuing to use the grey tape. Recommendations after the Birgenair crash included the use of bright, reflective, tape on static ports and pitot tubes when covering them is necessary.  

So, yes, you are correct, but incorrect at the same time. This crash did help change practices world wide as far as covering static ports, but it took the Birgenair crash before it, and the Aeroperu crash...and the loss of 259 lives, and two B757s, to get it done.
The cause of the accidents were different, TC-GEN's (the Birgenair jet) pitot tubes was clogged with a wasp's nest, while the Aeroperu crash had its static ports blocked. But yes, you are correct, these two are similar accidents, as they consitute instrument failure.


The pitot tube and static port work together to provide readings in the cockpit. See the article, it has a diagram that shows both and how the system works...so...the cause of both crashes was the same thing...
BLOCKAGE OF PITOT/STATIC SYSTEM.

When an airplane is parked for any length of time other then a turn-around, the pitot tubes are coverd with a pitot tube cover.

Read this article...

http://scienceray.com/technology/transport/plane-crashes-and-pitot-tubes/

It talks about both Aeroperu and Birgenair. From article:

"Ground crews could have saved Flight 301 by installing pitot tube covers while it sat idle."

Here is a pic of a random pitot tube cover...they prevent things like wasps building nests in the tubes...

http://www.tbmparts.com/customers/106110109520414/images/TBM_2010_Pitot_Cover_lg.jpg

« Last Edit: June 17, 2009, 08:40:46 PM by joeyb747 » Logged

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joeyb747
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« Reply #19 on: June 17, 2009, 09:55:15 PM »

Just incase anyone wants to read the transcripts, here they are:

Birgenair 301:

http://www.planecrashinfo.com/cvr960206.htm

Aeroperu 603:

http://www.planecrashinfo.com/cvr961002.htm
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