Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?
October 23, 2014, 10:29:19 AM
Home Help Login Register      
News: LiveATC.net Flyers Released!  Please click here to download & print a copy and be sure to post at an airport near you!


+  LiveATC Discussion Forums
|-+  Air Traffic Monitoring
| |-+  Aviation Audio Clips (Moderators: dave, RonR)
| | |-+  DC-10 blows nose gear tire on landing at BWI
« previous next »
Pages: [1] 2 Go Down Print
Author Topic: DC-10 blows nose gear tire on landing at BWI  (Read 22889 times)
Hollis
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 403


« on: May 07, 2009, 02:44:37 PM »

LINTHICUM, Md. (AP) — A charter airplane flying soldiers into a Maryland airport blew its front tire while landing and five crew members have been taken to a hospital for evaluation.

The World Airways DC10 landed around 1 p.m. Wednesday at Baltimore/Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport and blew a tire on the front nose gear. Airport spokesman Jonathan Dean said none of the 168 soldiers aboard was injured.

The plane was grounded on the runway for roughly two hours and the passengers got on shuttle buses to the terminal.

After the tire was replaced about 3:30 p.m., Dean said the airport reopened the runway. He said there was minimal disruption to other flights.


Logged
cessna157
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 708



WWW
« Reply #1 on: May 07, 2009, 03:29:30 PM »

Wow, sounds like they had all kinds of stuff go wrong.  Being a DC-10, I'd assume they don't have glass.  But it sounds like they lost their HSI and were turning with their magnetic compass.  I don't really understand how there were injuries from this, but obviously all of the facts haven't come in yet.
Logged

CRJ7/CRJ9 F/O, Travel Agent
cessna157
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 708



WWW
« Reply #2 on: May 07, 2009, 03:31:34 PM »

Ironically enough, as I post this, all 3 of the DC airports are shut down due to weather.
Logged

CRJ7/CRJ9 F/O, Travel Agent
joeyb747
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1583


Nothing Like A 747!


« Reply #3 on: May 07, 2009, 07:57:07 PM »

I noticed a couple of puzzling items.

At about the 6:00 mark, they reference "liquid off the right main". Did they hit something? that seems odd for a blown nose wheel.

Also, as cessna157 referenced, at about the 6:30 mark control says they "are bringing up the ILS for 33L now". And at 6:40, the pilot says they "are down to our whiskey compass".

So if I am hearing this right, they blew a nose tire, are leaking some sort of fluid, and have no navigational instrumentation? What happend here?   huh 
« Last Edit: May 07, 2009, 07:59:48 PM by joeyb747 » Logged

Aircraft Mechanic
atcman23
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 367



« Reply #4 on: May 08, 2009, 07:15:47 AM »

The warranty must have expired the day before.
Logged

Mark Spencer
ect76
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 224

EGPH


« Reply #5 on: May 08, 2009, 01:05:47 PM »

Haha, I think with it being a DC-10 the warranty expired a long time ago!  grin Although I see the joke  wink

I was also puzzled by the references to fluid and nav instruments. Anyone have any more info? Also, was the clip skipping for anyone else or is my laptop in a mood with me?
« Last Edit: May 08, 2009, 01:08:02 PM by ect76 » Logged
joeyb747
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1583


Nothing Like A 747!


« Reply #6 on: May 08, 2009, 10:35:43 PM »

Haha, I think with it being a DC-10 the warranty expired a long time ago!  grin Although I see the joke  wink

I was also puzzled by the references to fluid and nav instruments. Anyone have any more info? Also, was the clip skipping for anyone else or is my laptop in a mood with me?

It was skipping on me too...so don't distroy your laptop!  wink
Logged

Aircraft Mechanic
cessna157
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 708



WWW
« Reply #7 on: May 09, 2009, 11:33:39 AM »

The warranty must have expired the day before.

I would have expected a strange occurrence like this from an airbus, not an American made plane.
Logged

CRJ7/CRJ9 F/O, Travel Agent
Qantas119
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 23


Cessna 208B Super Cargo Master


« Reply #8 on: May 11, 2009, 07:46:20 PM »

I'm not sure but correct me if I'm wrong here but all of the commercially serving DC-10-30's were replaced by the innovative Boeing 777?

So i agree the warranty must have expired... long long ago smiley
Logged
ect76
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 224

EGPH


« Reply #9 on: May 11, 2009, 08:56:53 PM »

Not all - There are a few charter airlines (I.E. World) still using the DC-10 for charters and there are many, many out there in cargo ops (FedEx and many more).

Some airlines in other parts of the world are still flying the 10, and not all were replaced with 777s...Some would have been, yes, but many would be replaced with Airbii and any other of the fine widebody aircraft in production out there. It was up to the airline what they replaced it with - Your post makes it sound like EVERY 10 was replaced with a triple!  grin
Logged
joeyb747
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1583


Nothing Like A 747!


« Reply #10 on: May 11, 2009, 10:24:35 PM »

World Airways operates several variants of DC-10-30.

Here is DC-10-30 N137WA (cn 48282/355) in all pax config:

http://www.airliners.net/photo/World-Airways/McDonnell-Douglas-DC-10-30/1466778/L/&sid=845c7739f6d94e6f8479631f17a58b32

Here is DC-10-30(F) N303WL (cn 46917/211) in all cargo config:

http://www.airliners.net/photo/World-Airways-Cargo/McDonnell-Douglas-DC-10-30(F)/1423173/L/&sid=845c7739f6d94e6f8479631f17a58b32

And, even though most of these have been WDU, World did operate quite a few "CF" variants, or "Convertable Freighter", meaning they could be converted to freighter, passenger, or a mix combination setup, depending on need. Many of these are not needed any longer as many main-line airlines such as United and Continental retire their DC-10-30s, providing a surplus of airplanes. Here is World Airways DC-10-30CF N107WA (cn 46836/280) seen in 1983. If you look closely at the forward section, in the "ORLD" portion of the tittle, you can see the outline of the cargo door. Also note this bird has all of her windows uncovered. A classic looking scheme as well!

http://www.airliners.net/photo/World-Airways/McDonnell-Douglas-DC-10-30CF/1305584/L/&sid=845c7739f6d94e6f8479631f17a58b32

Enjoy the pics!  grin
« Last Edit: May 11, 2009, 10:26:24 PM by joeyb747 » Logged

Aircraft Mechanic
king friday
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 1


« Reply #11 on: May 12, 2009, 11:41:08 PM »

I was working at BWI the day this took place...trust me, there was plenty more that happened than a blown nose wheel.
Logged
cessna157
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 708



WWW
« Reply #12 on: May 13, 2009, 05:31:21 AM »

I was working at BWI the day this took place...trust me, there was plenty more that happened than a blown nose wheel.

Oh come on, you can't just say something like that without more information.

That's kinda like:
"So this one day I was up flying, and something happened"
Logged

CRJ7/CRJ9 F/O, Travel Agent
joeyb747
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1583


Nothing Like A 747!


« Reply #13 on: May 13, 2009, 10:32:37 AM »

I was working at BWI the day this took place...trust me, there was plenty more that happened than a blown nose wheel.

Oh come on, you can't just say something like that without more information.

That's kinda like:
"So this one day I was up flying, and something happened"

Yea...no kidding! Come on with the good stuff!  wink
Logged

Aircraft Mechanic
sjknowles
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 2


« Reply #14 on: May 17, 2009, 06:34:16 PM »

I was on this 6 May 09 emergency landing flight into BWI and found this forum in a therapeutic effort to try and get more information about what went wrong on our landing(s). I've found myself growing angrier everyday about how little info has been made readily available, specifically the public news articles that reported this as a rather mundane "tire blown on landing" story with no follow-up. 

What I can tell you with firsthand knowledge is the flight was returning military members, most of whom had just finished 4-6 month tours in support of OIF & OEF. We got onboard in Qatar and picked up this aircrew in Leipzig Germany.

I personally recall an initial MLG touchdown that was so violent we bounced up and for a small moment in time were in a zero-g environment before the acft came back down hard for the second time on its MLG... quickly followed by the nose of the acft slamming onto the runway with such force that the front of the plane bounced back up while various paneling from inside the acft began to come loose and either fall on top of us or swing suspended by their electrical connections. The SEVERE nose impact jolted the emergency oxygen masks loose from several of the seat backs and caused the aircrew cabin security door to be jarred open. This pilot then throttled up the engines as this first landing attempt sequence was sending us drifting/pitching/rolling so far right of center runway that those on the left could see the yellow center line while those on the right began to shout alarmingly about the wing being in the grass. This is what I saw from row 6.

Somehow we got airborne again, and what followed was 10 minutes or so of absolute helpless uncertainty about our immediate future in a passenger cabin that smelled of electrical fire. Some passengers commented on smoke coming up from under their seats as the flight attendant passed back a fire extinguisher that thankfully did not have to be used. The initial panic amongst the all military passenger base was quickly subdued by the fact that we were again airborne, but with a sickening concern/uncertainty of the acft’s structural integrity. Then began the silence as most prayed, some held hands, and others wept… I think it’s safe to say most of us (me included) sat in anticipation and pondered the irony of surviving a war 6,000 miles away only to meet our maker while landing back in the US.

As we came in for the second/final landing, the flight attendants began to repeatedly chant in unison for us grab our ankles and lower our heads. Seconds prior to touchdown, the pilot gave the brace for impact, brace for impact, brace for impact command. We landed so smooth… in comparison, it made no sense.

Multiple trained military medical personnel on board responded to one injured male flight attendant (severe back pain) before he was expedited off on a back board via the fire truck ladder.

After the waiting we were shuttled to the terminal, cleared customs and waited an hour or so for our luggage.

At this time, the standard military gag order was issued to the masses as we were informed that the news media was waiting for us. We all did our part, shaking the hands and thanking the wonderful USO reps and past American war veterans awaiting us while stating to the news media that any questions should be routed through Bolling AFB’s Public Affairs office and how we were just glad to be home.

Try keeping 160+ John Q. Publics silent and away from lawyers immediately following this “blown nose landing gear tire” landing.

The included web link has a very interesting thread that alludes to this acft likely being a total write off due to severe structural damage and to which it’s stated the supporting photos will not be released until a later date. 

http://www.airliners.net/aviation-forums/general_aviation/read.main/4405287/1/#1

If anyone has information regarding how it is we seemed to initially grossly misjudge our altitude on the first landing attempt, then land so perfectly during the ensuing emergency situation, please let me know. Right now the NTSB and FAA web sites have little to no info for flight WO8535, WOA8535, WO-8535, or N139WA – perhaps when the investigation is done.
« Last Edit: May 17, 2009, 07:19:50 PM by sjknowles » Logged
Pages: [1] 2 Go Up Print 
« previous next »
Jump to:  


Login with username, password and session length

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.20 | SMF © 2011, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!