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Author Topic: Double trouble at KSLC  (Read 11493 times)
englishpilot
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« Reply #15 on: March 22, 2008, 05:35:42 PM »

SkyWest 88B had a bird strike and UPS 2844 had a flap problem.
The audio is a bit 'choppy' since the KSLC feed scanner picks up all freqs.
SkyWest 88B did sustain quite a bit of damage from the hit.
But I am curious about him having hit a bird somewhere between 13,000 - 15,000 feet altitude. The highest known altitude record of observed geese flight was reported at between 9,000 - 10,000 feet.


Actually if I remember rightly, the highest was well into the 30,000s, I think about 35,000 and I believe it was over Ireland.  Can't find the source.  A 767 once had one at 14,000 AGL climbing out from Charles de Gaulle. 

A Ruppell's griffon vulture has been known to fly as high as 37,000ft.
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I don't proclaim to be the best pilot in the world but I'm safe.
Hollis
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« Reply #16 on: March 22, 2008, 07:28:10 PM »

I was thinking more of snow geese, or Canada goose which normally migrate at around 3000 ft. altitude, but have been seen as high as 10,000. The bar goose in Eastern Europe and Tibet area does fly routinely at 30,000 ft., but they are built for it. My guess is that the bird in question was probably of the vulture species and not a goose.
The higheast recorded aircraft-bird strike in the USA was a few years age when one was ingested into the engine of a commercial jet flight at an altitude of 21,000 ft. over Nevada.
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KSYR-pjr
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« Reply #17 on: March 22, 2008, 09:00:26 PM »

I was thinking more of snow geese, or Canada goose which normally migrate at around 3000 ft. altitude, but have been seen as high as 10,000.

Hmmm... I guess you missed the link to the US Fish and Wildlife website posted earlier in this thread that stated that the Canada Goose has been observed as high as 29,000 feet. 
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Regards, Peter
ATC Feed:  Syracuse (KSYR), NY
bcrosby
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« Reply #18 on: March 24, 2008, 10:10:03 AM »

The Transport Canada AIM, has some information about the location, height, and quantity of migratory birds:

http://www.tc.gc.ca/CivilAviation/publications/tp14371/RAC/1-1.htm#1-15-2

The diagrams might be more readable with the PDF version.
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JayDub
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« Reply #19 on: March 25, 2008, 12:19:21 AM »

Just a little clarification on the callsign.  dylanh is correct.

First off...SkyWest 88B is, indeed, a daily scheduled flight out of KSLC to KMCI.  It is marketed as Delta Connection/SkyWest 4088.

We use these alpha-numeric callsigns all the time...primarily in/out of KSLC.  They are usually a variation on the marketed flight number.  We file these callsigns to avoid controller/pilot confusion during higher-demand arrival/departure banks at the hub because there are so many similar SkyWest callsigns in the same airspace at the same time during these banks.  We have a few flights out of KORD and KATL that we file this way during heavier departure banks.  I believe we started doing this at ATC request.

The "United 916T"-type callsigns you hear are typically stub amends for through-flight continuation...especially when the continuation flight number is operated on a different aircraft/type.

As far as our reposition/ferry callsigns...there are so many circumstances that determine what flight number we use on those...all the way down to which codeshare partner's paint is on the aircraft.  That said, we almost never use alpha-numerics for repo/ferry.

Hope this helps!
« Last Edit: July 23, 2008, 01:50:49 AM by JayDub » Logged

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IFRSteveD
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« Reply #20 on: July 15, 2008, 08:38:01 PM »

But I am curious about him having hit a bird somewhere between 13,000 - 15,000 feet altitude. The highest known altitude record of observed geese flight was reported at between 9,000 - 10,000 feet.

According to the US Fish and Wildlife website (linked here) Canada Geese have been observed as high as 29,000 feet.  Look towards the bottom of the page in the "Migration" paragraph for this one-liner.

edit:  The Science Daily website discusses another type of goose  that routinely migrates at about 29,000 feet (9,000 meters)



Was talking with fellow controller over the weekend, has been controlling for more than 25 years.  He told me the story of a P3 coming back from Europe to CFB Trenton (Ontario).  They hit a goose over Greenland at FL230.  Busted the windshield badly, fortunately the Pilot had just gotten up to take a leak.  They managed to continue on, but...the had to continue the flight to Trenton at 9000ft at a speed of 180.  (so the pilots didn't freeze)...Apparently it was a long long flight. LOL
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