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Author Topic: Flight AA-311 KAUS - Mar 9th 2009 & Flight AA-309 LGA - Mar 11 2009  (Read 23031 times)
joeyb747
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« Reply #45 on: March 19, 2009, 08:16:09 PM »

I spoke with my Captain friend over at NWA. He said at NWA it depends on the situation. In the event of having to shut down an engine, the Captain would transfer flying duties to the F/O, and the Captain runs the QRH. He said, no offense to any F/Os in the house, it is to make sure the correct powerplant is shut down, and that the procedures are handled correctly. After the aircraft is stable, the Captain has his choice if he wants to take the airplane over, or if he has confidence in the F/O and his ability to handle the airplane in an emergency situation.

Now a situation like 1549, where the aircraft lost all thrust capabilities, the Captain would take over flying the airplane 100%.

Like I said, it depends on the situation. Utilize CRM to its fullest potential.

This is what he told me, just thought I'd add that to the mix. 
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cessna157
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« Reply #46 on: March 19, 2009, 08:56:22 PM »

Thats an interesting way to do it.

At my company, when it comes to shutting down an engine, or switching off a generator, or anything else that significantly effects the operation of the aircraft and can be confused with another switch, both pilots participate in the QRH.

For example, let's say you get a left engine fire indication.  The pilot flying assumes control of the radio and asks for the "Immediate Action Items" for a left engine fire.  The non-flying pilot then pulls out the QRH and starts reading the procedure (all QRH, and any checklist, procedures must be read aloud for CVR confirmation).

The non-flying pilot will read "Left engine thrust lever - confirm and idle" and place his hand on the left thrust lever and keep it there without doing or saying anything.  The pilot flying will then look at the EICAS once again to confirm that it is indeed the LEFT engine that is on fire, then look at the non-flying pilot's hand to make sure it is indeed on the LEFT thrust lever.  If it is, the pilot flying will say "Left engine thrust lever confirmed, idle."  At that point, the non-flying pilot moves the thrust lever to idle and both pilots monitor the aircraft to make sure the bad engine is indeed the one that has been commanded to idle. 

This banter back and forth between the pilots then continues on to shut the engine off, turn the fuel pump off, push the fire push button, and discharge the fire bottles.  It is all done very slowly and deliberately to make sure no mistakes are made. 

That's just the way my company does it.  Many other airlines use a very similar approach to it, apparently NWA doesn't.
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joeyb747
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« Reply #47 on: March 19, 2009, 09:07:08 PM »


At my company, when it comes to shutting down an engine, or switching off a generator, or anything else that significantly effects the operation of the aircraft and can be confused with another switch, both pilots participate in the QRH.


Absolutely. CRM plays a huge part in any decision making on a flight deck. I hope you don't think I meant at NWA the Captain is God, and his word is final...



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« Reply #48 on: March 20, 2009, 11:36:48 AM »

I was just making the point that you can't assume the copilot is working the radio. This is the procedure we have always used:

EMERGENCY ABNORMAL CHECKLIST
The Captain must take  action to establish and maintain airplane
control while determining a course of action.  If the First Officer is
flying, taking over control of the airplane may be required. Conversely, delegating
the physical flying of the airplane to the First Officer may enhance the Captain's
problem-solving processes and add to his  command of the situationUpon making this decision and once airplane control has been established, the
Captain will determine the nature of the problem and call for the appropriate
checklist.
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athaker
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« Reply #49 on: March 31, 2009, 09:25:53 AM »

In watching the congressional hearing from flight 1549 the Captain justified his reasons for taking over the aircraft...Basically along the lines of - I have more experience in the A320 so I flew the plane, and my F/O more recently had to certify for the A320 so he learned the emergency procedures more recently as well. therefore he is better suited to work the checklist since it is fresh with him.

obviously not a quote...but it supports your guys' argument that it depends on the situation, since he made no mention of any "standard procedure"
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