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Author Topic: KAC A320 engine fail  (Read 18041 times)
Whocares
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« on: June 26, 2007, 04:02:58 PM »

Engine failure after take off.
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janos79
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« Reply #1 on: June 26, 2007, 05:21:43 PM »

i know most pilots dont like to declare the emergency but you are just being too bold when it comes to an engine failure.
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Whocares
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« Reply #2 on: June 26, 2007, 05:45:53 PM »

Actually it depends on who you ask. The are are two schools of thought here: some captains say since it's a two--engined aircraft, yes you should. As if the other one goes, then you are just a big glider.

While others believe that it's an urgency as apposed to an emergency. If you were to ask them then what would constitute an emergency they'll tell you that an engine fire would.

Actually an engine failure is no biggie. We practice it in the sim every 6 months, so it's like second nature when it happens. You just go through the drills.
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TrixieKQ
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« Reply #3 on: June 26, 2007, 06:29:33 PM »

The controller's voice was too garbled for me to tell...  Did he ask the pilot if the engine had actually separated from the aircraft?  They are supposed to if the pilot uses "lost the engine" to report an engine failure.  I've never actually heard that scenario before.



While others believe that it's an urgency as apposed to an emergency. If you were to ask them then what would constitute an emergency they'll tell you that an engine fire would.

Actually an engine failure is no biggie. We practice it in the sim every 6 months, so it's like second nature when it happens. You just go through the drills.

I assume that the engine physically separating from the aircraft would constitute an emergency, right?


Peace
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Controller:  "You know what happens when you assume something, right?"

Trainee:  "Yeah, you *$#* up."
Whocares
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« Reply #4 on: June 26, 2007, 09:06:40 PM »

The controller asks him why he wants to come back to the airport. The pilot says due to an engine failure, then the controller asks if he's declaring an emergency, the pilot replies "no". The controller doesn't hear him so he asks again.

Well yes. just because some metal pieces might have damaged other parts/systems on the plane, like hydraulic, pressurization, or fuel lines. But essentially it's similar to an engine failure, since you only have 1 remaining engine in both cases.

I would call a Mayday on a separation.
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athaker
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« Reply #5 on: June 28, 2007, 06:52:23 PM »

where was this?
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Whocares
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« Reply #6 on: June 28, 2007, 06:59:42 PM »

OKBK - Kuwait Intl.
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Hollis
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« Reply #7 on: June 28, 2007, 07:46:13 PM »

An engine failure in itself does not constitute an emergency, since the aircraft are designed to cover just that situation. It does usually require the pilot to go to 'Plan B', such as return to the airport or deviate to the nearest suitable one if enroute. Priority handling is usually requested.
Declaring an emergency requires that all other traffic give way to that aircraft and that the airport equipment be rolled out.
A Mayday means the potential for a possible disaster.
A seldom used declaration is 'Pan-pan-pan'. A serious emergency, but not quite a Mayday.

p.s. - 'lost engine' actually means 'lost POWER'
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yousef980
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« Reply #8 on: June 30, 2007, 02:35:07 PM »

Hello ,

I wanted to crawl through the archive to search for the clip , so thanks alot . I read about it on the paper . It was flight 617 boarding to DOHA , Qatar .

I am afraid  Kuwait Airways having problem when it comes to maintenance wise . Maybe they are making a big thing of it in the papers but it makes people feel worried one way or another .  I remember now the A320 plane which had emergency landing at UAE airport few months ago . I recall some reports on the newspaper on lack of maintenance of  H.H. the Prince airplance !!  Couple of days ago I read that an engineer had checked 3 jets in 10 minutes ! You cant read things like that not re-considering your flight with KU .

ALl the best ,

Yousef
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Whocares
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« Reply #9 on: July 01, 2007, 08:47:36 AM »

Maintenance is quite good in KAC. The problem is that the management doesn’t want to spend money on spare parts since they will be phasing all the 300/310/320 out soon.

The 320 that made an emergency landing in Ras Al Khaima a few months back was due to a faulty sensor in the nose wheel indication system. Basically the system told the pilot that the nose wheel was not down, when actually it was. After a visual inspection by the tower, who told them that it was down, there was no way to confirm if it was locked. That could mean that he nose wheel may collapse when it touched the runway. Thankfully it didn't

Again we practice those scenarios. Practice makes perfect.
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yousef980
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« Reply #10 on: July 01, 2007, 03:01:02 PM »

Hello ,

Speaking of A320 . What do you think of JAZEERA A320s ? I am not a specialist , I am just a fan of aviation , but I guess they are burning their equipments ! 
Only 5 jets flying for like 15 or 18 destinations .  Do you think it is ok with that ?

Some distenations , are so far away and from my readings , A320 is more a regional jet rather than medium and long distance destineations . I guess some jets fly twice a day ...

I would love to hear a specialist point of view ...

All the best ,
Youssef
 
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Whocares
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« Reply #11 on: July 01, 2007, 03:10:36 PM »

Well, they are new planes, for starters, so failures are pretty rare. The planes fly all day and night, the addage goes "A plane doesn't make money when its on the ground"

The 320's are officially a short-medium haul planes. Regional jets they are not. All the planes fly up to 8 flights a day!
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xnvyflyer
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« Reply #12 on: July 02, 2007, 01:26:45 AM »

Unless the pilot knows why the engine failed and is 100 percent sure the other one won't fail, why not declare an emergency?  In a heartbeat.  It's in everybody's best interest it would seem.
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Whocares
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« Reply #13 on: July 02, 2007, 07:10:52 AM »

Like I said:
Actually it depends on who you ask. The are are two schools of thought here: some captains say since it's a two--engined aircraft, yes you should. As if the other one goes, then you are just a big glider.

While others believe that it's an urgency as apposed to an emergency. If you were to ask them then what would constitute an emergency they'll tell you that an engine fire would.

Actually an engine failure is no biggie. We practice it in the sim every 6 months, so it's like second nature when it happens. You just go through the drills.


It actually wont make a difference. If you declare and emergency all the ground equiptment will be rolled out and the passengers will see that and some may panic. The pilot usually doesn't know why the engine failed, how could he? He can't see inside and see if say, a fan blade broke off. If the indications in the cockpit indicate that the engine is not damaged (the fan is still turning which the pilot can tell from the N1 and N2 dials) he can try to restart it. If it still doesn't work, well tough!

There is no way for the pilot to be 100% that the other one wont fail, again, how could he? The only way to garuantee that the other engine will fail is when he is sufferring from fuel starvation.

And it is exactly that point that make the "other school of thought" to tell you to declare an emergency.
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Actually it depends on who you ask. The are are two schools of thought here: some captains say since it's a two--engined aircraft, yes you should. As if the other one goes, then you are just a big glider.

While others believe that it's an urgency as apposed to an emergency. If you were to ask them then what would constitute an emergency they'll tell you that an engine fire would.


Like I said, an engine failure is not a big deal.
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DashDriver
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« Reply #14 on: July 16, 2007, 07:56:56 PM »

My company requires you to declare an emergency with an engine failure.  I couldn't imagine not doing so.

Yes, I see it in the sim every year, and it is not that big of a deal.  However, it's not a normal operation and requires a return to the field, or landing at the nearest suitable airport.
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