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| | |-+  KSEA Puzzling Turbulance
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Author Topic: KSEA Puzzling Turbulance  (Read 6591 times)
DTAK
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« on: February 01, 2006, 11:58:15 AM »

The controller is becoming a favorite of mine at SEA.  He seems to have switched to days this week, and in good form this morning (Wednesday 2/1).

He has a unique "cleared to land" call.

This morning, looking out the window, he spots a potential problem.
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Tomato
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« Reply #1 on: February 01, 2006, 01:35:53 PM »

Pilot-induced turbulence?  ...do I even want to know what that means?!  shocked

Nice clip though!  Smiley
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Jason
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« Reply #2 on: February 01, 2006, 01:41:12 PM »

Quote from: Tomato
Pilot-induced turbulence?  ...do I even want to know what that means?!  shocked

Nice clip though!  Smiley


One of the two pilots flew the aircraft using quick, abrupt control inputs which looked like the plane was going through turbulence.

Pilot-induced turbulence IOW means: Pilot controlled the airplane with sharp control movements and the control pressures used created turbulance due to those inputs.

Awesome clip!  Haven't heard something like this in a while.  ...controller also sounds like he's on the ball.

Jason

P.S. Pilot-induced turbulence in the case it was used in this clip was kind of a joke as well.  The ATCT thought the plane was going through some sort of turbulance, but the pilot admitted it was basically their fault. <g>
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Tomato
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« Reply #3 on: February 01, 2006, 01:44:14 PM »

Got it!  ...and yeah, I kinda understood the joke-part of it.  I'm curious though, is there a situation where pilots usually perform these quick movements?
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Jason
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« Reply #4 on: February 01, 2006, 01:50:13 PM »

Quote from: Tomato
Got it!  ...and yeah, I kinda understood the joke-part of it.  I'm curious though, is there a situation where pilots usually perform these quick movements?


IMO: It's the result of poor airmanship, but 20 other people will give you 20 other answers/opinions.  In some cases though it could be a result of wind shear or wake turbulence, but pilot-induced turbulence generally means that the turbulence is being felt due to pilot input.

There is no situation IMO that would require a pilot to create their own induced turbulance.  It's usually a result of abrupt rudder and alieron/elevator controls.

Jason
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Jolly009
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« Reply #5 on: February 01, 2006, 01:53:15 PM »

Well in Seattle...  I can only think of Big Buildings, Birds, and the abrupt eruption of Mt. Rainier or St. Helens... and well, he might of had one too many in the O club....  smiley (JOKING ONLY)
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Kevin Schultz
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frantzy
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« Reply #6 on: February 04, 2006, 09:11:07 PM »

Quote from: Jason
Quote from: Tomato

There is no situation IMO that would require a pilot to create their own induced turbulance.  It's usually a result of abrupt rudder and alieron/elevator controls.


I can think of another scenario:  practicing steep turns, I always knew I did a good one when, at the end of the 360-degree turn, I ran into my own wake turbulence.
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Jason
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« Reply #7 on: February 04, 2006, 09:28:32 PM »

Quote from: frantzy
I can think of another scenario:  practicing steep turns, I always knew I did a good one when, at the end of the 360-degree turn, I ran into my own wake turbulence.


That's definitely a great example of a situation, and I have experienced that before as well.  The point I was making was intended for larger, heavier, less menueverable aircraft and I should have also included that I was talking about an approach-to-land scenerio.  I haven't done steep turns on final and I sure would't recommend it  at such a low altitude<g>  wink .

Thanks for bringing up an interesting point....I didn't think about that one! cheesy

Jason
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frantzy
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« Reply #8 on: February 05, 2006, 12:07:59 AM »

Quote from: Jason
The point I was making was intended for larger, heavier, less menueverable aircraft and I should have also included that I was talking about an approach-to-land scenerio.


Your main point was certainly correct, Jason, I was just joking around...

Mike
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