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Author Topic: The Aviation Quiz (Beginner)  (Read 6525 times)
UnitedFlyer737
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« on: December 19, 2013, 04:25:00 PM »

Hello everyone. I've recently created an aviation quiz in my free time just for fun. Currently, there is only one quiz and it's 15 questions and easy/beginner difficulty. If you want to try it out, you can click on this link: http://www.proprofs.com/quiz-school/story.php?title=NjEwODE3.

If you enjoy the quiz, let me know. I'll make a Medium & Hard difficulty quiz!
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JayH
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« Reply #1 on: December 19, 2013, 11:00:23 PM »

You should fix question 3. A stall occurs when the critical angle of attack is exceeded and can occur at any attitude and airspeed.
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UnitedFlyer737
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« Reply #2 on: December 20, 2013, 08:10:11 PM »

You should fix question 3. A stall occurs when the critical angle of attack is exceeded and can occur at any attitude and airspeed.
Any airspeed? I've never heard of a stall happening above of the minimal airspeed for an aircraft. I'm not saying your information is false, I'm just wondering, do you have an example in which a stall happens above the minimal airspeed for an aircraft? And also, yes, I do know that a stall can happen at any attitude.
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InterpreDemon
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« Reply #3 on: December 20, 2013, 09:25:31 PM »

Sure. If the dust bin of my memory serves, a C172 stalls clean ("minimal airspeed") at around 45 kias, so next time you are motoring along at 60 or 70 (and are at least 4,000 AGL and/or have had some spin training) just yank the yoke all the way back into your belly as fast as you can and see if your ass falls out from under you before the speed drops to 45. If that doesn't convince you, try holding a level 60 deg bank turn at 60 kts. JayH is correct.
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UnitedFlyer737
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« Reply #4 on: December 20, 2013, 09:36:00 PM »

Sure. If the dust bin of my memory serves, a C172 stalls clean ("minimal airspeed") at around 45 kias, so next time you are motoring along at 60 or 70 (and are at least 4,000 AGL and/or have had some spin training) just yank the yoke all the way back into your belly as fast as you can and see if your ass falls out from under you before the speed drops to 45. If that doesn't convince you, try holding a level 60 deg bank turn at 60 kts. JayH is correct.
Ah, thanks for the examples.
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UnitedFlyer737
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« Reply #5 on: December 20, 2013, 09:39:43 PM »

I think I'm going to keep question 3 the same though. Seeing as although a stall can happen in different situations other then just getting below minimal airpseed (As InterpreDemon and JayH said), in most cases it does happen when the airspeed gets too low. Also, the answer for number three is still true because of that.
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InterpreDemon
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« Reply #6 on: December 21, 2013, 01:00:08 AM »

No, it is not that simple, in fact if one could only choose between "airspeed too low" and "angle of attack too high", I would have to go with the latter as the more correct of the two incomplete answers, especially as altitude and speed increase. The Air France flight that fell into the Atlantic was well above flyable airspeed the entire eight minutes it took to plunge from cruising altitude, but because the pilots were debating "laws" and trying to "point and click" their way out of trouble rather than flying the aircraft like real pilots, they were holding the plane deeply stalled in a ridiculously nose high attitude the entire time. At cruise most airliners have an acceptable range of angle of attack that is just a few degrees, and exceeding it can cause a stall even at Mach .8

Probably the best simplistic answer you could have would be that a stall occurs "when the angle of attack is too high for a given airspeed"
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UnitedFlyer737
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« Reply #7 on: December 21, 2013, 02:11:16 PM »

No, it is not that simple, in fact if one could only choose between "airspeed too low" and "angle of attack too high", I would have to go with the latter as the more correct of the two incomplete answers, especially as altitude and speed increase. The Air France flight that fell into the Atlantic was well above flyable airspeed the entire eight minutes it took to plunge from cruising altitude, but because the pilots were debating "laws" and trying to "point and click" their way out of trouble rather than flying the aircraft like real pilots, they were holding the plane deeply stalled in a ridiculously nose high attitude the entire time. At cruise most airliners have an acceptable range of angle of attack that is just a few degrees, and exceeding it can cause a stall even at Mach .8

Probably the best simplistic answer you could have would be that a stall occurs "when the angle of attack is too high for a given airspeed"
I understand that it isn't a simple concept, I never stated that it was. All I'm getting at is that for a beginner quiz such as the one I've made, I want to keep the questions in more simpler terms. As I stated earlier, the question states "A stall is when an aircraft has lost too much speed and can no longer climb. Instead, it falls" and it's in true or false format. Although it can also happen when the "angle of attack is too high", it can also happen in the statement the question says. Therefor, the question isn't incorrect. I also believe that more people notice a stall as when the airspeed gets too low, rather then when the angle of attack is too high.
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InterpreDemon
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« Reply #8 on: December 21, 2013, 04:03:41 PM »

Well, you're probably right there... the ones who didn't notice the high angle of attack are probably dead. When looking at quizzes like this, I try to think of the best answer that a non-pilot could take away for some future unintended emergency, so if they only knew of one cause for a stall, which correction of such cause would be most likely to save their lives? Just think about your basic stall training... what is the first action you take toward recovery, increasing power or reducing the angle of attack? If the typical lay person associates speed with the power setting or throttle and climb or descent with attitude or elevator control, as I suspect they do, if they remembered your quiz answer the first thing they would be doing to recover is add power rather than drop the nose, which in a small single-engine aircraft would likely throw them into a spin. On the other hand if they are taught that a stall occurs "when the nose is too high" and to reduce back pressure or push the stick forward, not only is it a corrective action that does not assume power is available, but is also more likely to enable our hapless pilot to have a chance to live through the next few minutes of unscheduled basic flight training as well.
« Last Edit: December 21, 2013, 04:24:32 PM by InterpreDemon » Logged

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martyj19
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« Reply #9 on: December 21, 2013, 05:20:47 PM »

It's not correct to say that an aircraft at a low airspeed "can no longer climb".  This depends completely on whether more power is available.  Anyone who has completed primary flight training has spent a long time at low airspeeds doing turns, climbs, and descents at or near the so called "minimum controllable airspeed" and in "slow flight".
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UnitedFlyer737
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« Reply #10 on: December 21, 2013, 06:43:46 PM »

It's not correct to say that an aircraft at a low airspeed "can no longer climb".  This depends completely on whether more power is available.  Anyone who has completed primary flight training has spent a long time at low airspeeds doing turns, climbs, and descents at or near the so called "minimum controllable airspeed" and in "slow flight".

Sorry, it was somewhat worded weirdly. What I was trying to say is if the aircraft reaches a speed that is too low for sufficient lift, it can't continue to climb and will start to fall. Also, I haven't completed 'Primary flight training' yet as I'm only 14 years of age. And it doesn't state "An aircraft at a low airspeed can no longer climb". It states "When the aircraft has lost too much airspeed and can no longer climb"
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InterpreDemon
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« Reply #11 on: December 21, 2013, 10:29:19 PM »

UF, I hope you get the chance to enter into flight training, it is a skill you will treasure your entire life, and toward that end I recommend you start reading this free publication courtesy of the FAA, much updated since my time as a student pilot decades ago:

http://www.faa.gov/regulations_policies/handbooks_manuals/aviation/pilot_handbook/

To help you with your quiz project, you might begin with chapter four.
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martyj19
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« Reply #12 on: December 21, 2013, 11:01:17 PM »

I second the remarks of InterpreDemon, may you have the opportunity to enter into flight training, and a simulator doesn't count.  A simulator leads you into bad habits that you have to unlearn in actual flight.


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UnitedFlyer737
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« Reply #13 on: December 22, 2013, 03:30:54 AM »

UF, I hope you get the chance to enter into flight training, it is a skill you will treasure your entire life, and toward that end I recommend you start reading this free publication courtesy of the FAA, much updated since my time as a student pilot decades ago:

http://www.faa.gov/regulations_policies/handbooks_manuals/aviation/pilot_handbook/

To help you with your quiz project, you might begin with chapter four.

Thanks for the link to the handbook. I'll definitely take a look at it.
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