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Author Topic: An-225 callsign with ATC  (Read 10669 times)
EivlEvo
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« Reply #15 on: April 07, 2007, 08:12:17 PM »

Sorry guys... didn't mean to get everyone confused.

Im not implying that an aircraft like the 747 can be listed as anything other than a heavy. I was saying that while this aircraft is a heavy at its minimum takeoff weight, and at its maximum takeoff weight, it would still produce significantly different wake turbulence at either of those weights. So I was merely suggesting that a 747 heavy will also know if they are a "heavy 747 heavy" or a "light 747 heavy"

But... since it appears that that is how its listed in 7110 I wonder where my brain ascertained that information from.

hmmm... It wouldn't have anything to do regarding Parallel ILS or close parallel ILS would it?

Also, does it specify any weight specs for what to consider an aircraft as? ie Heavy Medium or Light?

~DAVE

Now Im just plain fascinated
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tyketto
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« Reply #16 on: April 07, 2007, 08:58:36 PM »

Sorry guys... didn't mean to get everyone confused.

Im not implying that an aircraft like the 747 can be listed as anything other than a heavy. I was saying that while this aircraft is a heavy at its minimum takeoff weight, and at its maximum takeoff weight, it would still produce significantly different wake turbulence at either of those weights. So I was merely suggesting that a 747 heavy will also know if they are a "heavy 747 heavy" or a "light 747 heavy"

But... since it appears that that is how its listed in 7110 I wonder where my brain ascertained that information from.

hmmm... It wouldn't have anything to do regarding Parallel ILS or close parallel ILS would it?

Also, does it specify any weight specs for what to consider an aircraft as? ie Heavy Medium or Light?

~DAVE

Now Im just plain fascinated

That... is a VERY good question! Smiley

The only thing I can think of is that if a heavy is following a lighter aircraft to a runway parallel to the one the lighter aircraft is on approach for. A controller could clear the heavier aircraft for a visual approach to the runway, give the speed of the lighter aircraft, and have the heavy jet get wing to wing with the ligher one, but not overtake the lighter plane. Once they overtake, they'd have a deal because of the possible wake turbulence. There's a pic on airliners.net at LAX where a B747 is wing to wing with a LJ45 on approach to the 25s, and touch down at the same time. Just as long as the 747 doesn't pass the Lear, it's all legal.

Same could (should?) apply for the AN-225, A380, and any other heavy jet..

BL.

P.S. This may not be what you're looking for, but http://www.faa.gov/ATPubs/ATC/Appendices/atcapda.html has the weight classes you're looking for for a given plane.
« Last Edit: April 07, 2007, 09:01:22 PM by tyketto » Logged
Pygmie
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« Reply #17 on: April 07, 2007, 09:00:57 PM »

Light - An aircraft certificated for a maximum take-off weight of 15,500 pounds or less.

Medium - An aircraft certificated for a maximum take-off weight of more than 15,500 pounds, but less than 300,000 pounds.

Heavy - An aircraft certificated for a maximum take-off weight of 300,000 pounds or more.
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tyketto
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« Reply #18 on: April 07, 2007, 09:02:17 PM »

Light - An aircraft certificated for a maximum take-off weight of 15,500 pounds or less.

Medium - An aircraft certificated for a maximum take-off weight of more than 15,500 pounds, but less than 300,000 pounds.

Heavy - An aircraft certificated for a maximum take-off weight of 300,000 pounds or more.

Heavy should be more than 255,000lbs, not 300,000. Other than that, I believe that's right. Smiley

BL.

EDIT: Actually, it would help if I also read the entire link I post!  grin

Here's the lowdown:

Quote
AIRCRAFT WEIGHT CLASSES

a. Heavy. Aircraft capable of takeoff weights of more than 255,000 pounds whether or not they are operating at this weight during a particular phase of flight.

b. Large. Aircraft of more than 41,000 pounds, maximum certificated takeoff weight, up to 255,000 pounds.

c. Small. Aircraft of 41,000 pounds or less maximum certificated takeoff weight.

That's from the link above.

BL.
« Last Edit: April 07, 2007, 09:07:26 PM by tyketto » Logged
Pygmie
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« Reply #19 on: April 07, 2007, 09:09:16 PM »

Light - An aircraft certificated for a maximum take-off weight of 15,500 pounds or less.

Medium - An aircraft certificated for a maximum take-off weight of more than 15,500 pounds, but less than 300,000 pounds.

Heavy - An aircraft certificated for a maximum take-off weight of 300,000 pounds or more.

Heavy should be more than 255,000lbs, not 300,000. Other than that, I believe that's right. Smiley

BL.


Maybe in the U.S., but 300,000 is the magic number up here in Canada.
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EivlEvo
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« Reply #20 on: April 07, 2007, 09:47:57 PM »

I think both aircraft have to be on a visual approach no? With Dependant Parallel, Simultaneous Parallel and Simultaneous Close parallel they have varied separation... is this the same for all instrument approaches? Meaning... aside from those 3 types of ILS what is the spacing required for parallel non-precision approaches?

Why would the 74 not be able to overtake?

~DAVE
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digger
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« Reply #21 on: April 08, 2007, 12:40:04 AM »

I don't know anything about how much wake turbulence the 380 will put out, but I've been told that the reason that "heavy" applies above 255,000 lbs is that that number was chosen so that the 757 would be below it. Boeing has some pull in DC too...
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Pygmie
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« Reply #22 on: April 08, 2007, 12:58:38 AM »

I think both aircraft have to be on a visual approach no? With Dependant Parallel, Simultaneous Parallel and Simultaneous Close parallel they have varied separation... is this the same for all instrument approaches? Meaning... aside from those 3 types of ILS what is the spacing required for parallel non-precision approaches?

Why would the 74 not be able to overtake?

~DAVE

Wake turbulence can come off the tips of the wings and flow outwards and downwards.  When aircraft are conducting dependant parallel approaches, you cannot let an aircraft of a higher weight class overtake a lower weight class, since there is a chance that the winds and normal drift of the wake turb. vortacies may interfere with the aircraft being overtaken.
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