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Author Topic: Another controller suspended  (Read 5943 times)
cptbrw
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« on: March 30, 2011, 07:44:27 AM »

A central Florida ATC controller has been suspended for an incident in which a Southwest flight en route to Orlando was requested to check on a non-responsive private plane en route to the nearby Kissimmee airport.  As a result, the aircraft lost separation minimums as the Southwest 737 came close enough to the Cirrus to observe occupants inside the Cirrus.


http://avherald.com/h?article=43a2096f&opt=0
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jmallard
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« Reply #1 on: March 30, 2011, 10:57:48 AM »

I read an article that stated that (and I'm paraphrasing here), " although pilots are sometimes asked to fly by and check on other pilots, the rules were not followed in this case."

As long as the pilots accepted responsibility for separation, what's the problem here? Is there any insight as to which rules were broken?
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ogogog
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« Reply #2 on: March 30, 2011, 11:53:38 AM »

may have had less that 1000' or less that 3 miles before SWA reported the traffic in sight.the pilot has to say they will maintain vis sep on the freq before losing standard seperation.
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w0x0f
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« Reply #3 on: March 30, 2011, 12:12:03 PM »

I think the supervisor conducting this operation may get caught with the technicality that the SR22 pilot must also be informed that visual separation is being applied prior to losing standard separation.
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ogogog
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« Reply #4 on: March 30, 2011, 12:22:31 PM »

yea i forgot about that part, best thing is that it was a supervisor, BHAHAHAHAHAHAHAH. in the last week its been FFA management 2 controllers 0.
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djmodifyd
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« Reply #5 on: March 30, 2011, 12:22:40 PM »

I think the supervisor conducting this operation may get caught with the technicality that the SR22 pilot must also be informed that visual separation is being applied prior to losing standard separation.

I believe that's only required when the targets are likely to merge, might be wrong there though

I also wouldn't do this with an air carrier, but that's personal preference. If the supe did the operation correctly I dont see the problem, but he might have not done it correctly
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ogogog
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« Reply #6 on: March 30, 2011, 01:05:34 PM »

I think the supervisor conducting this operation may get caught with the technicality that the SR22 pilot must also be informed that visual separation is being applied prior to losing standard separation.

I believe that's only required when the targets are likely to merge, might be wrong there though

I also wouldn't do this with an air carrier, but that's personal preference. If the supe did the operation correctly I dont see the problem, but he might have not done it correctly

they got him on the rule that says you have to be ABLE to communicate to the 2nd aircraft either directly or through another controller, not that you have to.
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sykocus
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« Reply #7 on: March 30, 2011, 04:19:38 PM »

I read an article that stated that (and I'm paraphrasing here), " although pilots are sometimes asked to fly by and check on other pilots, the rules were not followed in this case."

As long as the pilots accepted responsibility for separation, what's the problem here? Is there any insight as to which rules were broken?

It's impossible to say without knowing the exact sequence of events. Some people have already brought up good points. Another one is if 737 got the SR22 in sight, was told to maintain visual separation, then passed over the top of it at less then 1000'. Then there is possibly wake turbulence separation to consider and the SR22 is the only one who can accept visual separation since they would be effected by the wake of the 737. There's also the technical problem of a 737 can't see an aircraft operating behind it so it can't really maintain visual separation with an aircraft it can no longer see. But it's all speculation without knowing the specifics.
« Last Edit: March 30, 2011, 04:33:59 PM by sykocus » Logged

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cptbrw
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« Reply #8 on: March 31, 2011, 07:58:34 AM »

Turns out Southwest has suspended the Captain and First Officer for their actions as well.

http://www.cnn.com/2011/TRAVEL/03/29/faa.southwest.incident/
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alltheway
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« Reply #9 on: March 31, 2011, 09:03:21 AM »

Maybe when you look at this from the airline and FAA point of view....

A 737 vs Sirrus is commercial vs general aviation, where there is such a size difference and speed difference...

Where a Sirrus can make a short turn, the 737 can't, hence even fighterjets can't go that slow..... Evasive manouvres would be near impossible....

Big birds chase big birds and smaller birds are difficult to catch.....
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klkm
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« Reply #10 on: March 31, 2011, 04:49:23 PM »

Pretty sure the military has plenty of helicopters that could come meet up with a cirrus.  They don't send fighters every time, even the sheriff or police department could have sent up a helicopter.  After 5 minutes we have to report a NORDO.  There should be some sort of law enforcement/military aircraft on the NORDO before an hour goes by.  This is the whole reason for the awareness of NORDO aircraft.  Seems like the supervisor got tired of waiting decided to do something on their own and is getting burned for it.  Sounds to me like someone messed up behind the scenes in not coordinating an intercept prior to this. 
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djmodifyd
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« Reply #11 on: March 31, 2011, 05:48:35 PM »

I think the supervisor conducting this operation may get caught with the technicality that the SR22 pilot must also be informed that visual separation is being applied prior to losing standard separation.

I believe that's only required when the targets are likely to merge, might be wrong there though

I also wouldn't do this with an air carrier, but that's personal preference. If the supe did the operation correctly I dont see the problem, but he might have not done it correctly


they got him on the rule that says you have to be ABLE to communicate to the 2nd aircraft either directly or through another controller, not that you have to.

That rule only applies when the controller is providing the visual separation, which a radar controller never does. If the pilot is providing the visual separation the controller needs not be able to talk to the 2nd aircraft.

I don't think SWA was ever instructed to maintain visual separation, and the fact that it was a commercial aircraft is what is making this a bad thing.
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w0x0f
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« Reply #12 on: April 01, 2011, 02:24:41 PM »

I think the supervisor conducting this operation may get caught with the technicality that the SR22 pilot must also be informed that visual separation is being applied prior to losing standard separation.

I believe that's only required when the targets are likely to merge, might be wrong there though

I also wouldn't do this with an air carrier, but that's personal preference. If the supe did the operation correctly I dont see the problem, but he might have not done it correctly


they got him on the rule that says you have to be ABLE to communicate to the 2nd aircraft either directly or through another controller, not that you have to.

That rule only applies when the controller is providing the visual separation, which a radar controller never does. If the pilot is providing the visual separation the controller needs not be able to talk to the 2nd aircraft.

I don't think SWA was ever instructed to maintain visual separation, and the fact that it was a commercial aircraft is what is making this a bad thing.

I interpret the paragraph differently.  Radar controllers need to have the ability to communicate with the second aircraft according to 7-2-1.

http://www.faa.gov/air_traffic/publications/atpubs/ATC/atc0702.html#atc0702.html.
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Hollis
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« Reply #13 on: April 01, 2011, 07:46:12 PM »

I think the FAA and SWA have gone a little bit overboard on this situation.
9/11 comes to mind.
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RV1
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« Reply #14 on: April 03, 2011, 12:10:33 AM »

Pretty sure the military has plenty of helicopters that could come meet up with a cirrus.   even the sheriff or police department could have sent up a helicopter. 
SR-20 & 22s at 11000' can move along at 170-190kts. F16 fighters can operate below that speed if needed. Lately, we've had them playing tag with a C172, which is much slower than the Cirrius. It would take a while for a helicopter to climb to 11K' AND do 170-190kts forward speed to keep up with the Cirrius.
Aren't we supposed to call the DEN and let them handle situations like this? And yes, 737s can fly the same speed as the Cirrus, when necessary. (They are called fluffs for a reason)
I do see this preventing others from asking/doing things like this in the future!
... If only they had used their TAM.   (Tower to Air Missile)
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