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Author Topic: ATC  (Read 7818 times)
digger
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« Reply #15 on: February 23, 2006, 10:23:14 AM »

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Digger... you're just a trouble maker now, aren't you!  


I do have my moments...    Cheesy

As far as "vectors", I'm sure it stems from the mathematical/physics term having to do with the velocity and direction of something. After all, when a controller gives a "vector", those are the things they are controlling.
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n57flyguy
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« Reply #16 on: February 23, 2006, 05:17:44 PM »

Quote from: KSYR-pjr
Quote from: n57flyguy
alright, what exactly are vectors, antohor stupid question, better ask now before I make my self look all stupid, If I havnt already!!!


Vectors are ATC assigned headings that typically have an end-goal, for example:

ATC:  "Turn left heading 120, vectors to the localizer"

or

ATC: "Turn right 010, this is a vector around opposite direction traffic."

The headings in the above examples are the vectors, the word "vector" above is just the reason that ATC will typically provide for the heading.


so that would be on say an ILS approach?
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PHL Approach
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« Reply #17 on: February 23, 2006, 06:20:16 PM »

Quote from: n57flyguy
Quote from: KSYR-pjr
Quote from: n57flyguy
alright, what exactly are vectors, antohor stupid question, better ask now before I make my self look all stupid, If I havnt already!!!


Vectors are ATC assigned headings that typically have an end-goal, for example:

ATC:  "Turn left heading 120, vectors to the localizer"

or

ATC: "Turn right 010, this is a vector around opposite direction traffic."

The headings in the above examples are the vectors, the word "vector" above is just the reason that ATC will typically provide for the heading.


so that would be on say an ILS approach?


It could have to do with any type of approach. You know how Philly North Arrival will even say Vector for a visual. "United 470, Philly Approach, Depart BUNTS heading 100, vector for visual approach 27R, Philly altimeter 3015". Then if you go listen to Enroute they use "vector" often. "Delta 1665, fly heading 170, vector for your descent". "Alitalia 788 Heavy, turn right heading 250, short vector for traffic". Im sure JD would really get into more of the Enroute use of the word and pull some .65 stuff out.

tr.v. vec·tored, vec·tor·ing, vec·tors

    To guide (a pilot or aircraft, for example) by means of radio communication according to vectors.

Just pulled that, so really using that word in our case is it's own meaning and not so much as the mathmatical term that digger mentioned.
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KSYR-pjr
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« Reply #18 on: February 23, 2006, 09:07:33 PM »

Quote from: n57flyguy
so that would be on say an ILS approach?


Yes, it is very common for ATC to vector an aircraft (assign headings to guide the aircraft) to an ILS approach.    As pointed out in the previous response, ATC vectors are common for all types of instrument approaches, including VOR, GPS, localizer, NDB, and back course localizer approaches.

Vectors are also commonly used when guiding departing aircraft away from the airport and to their first fix/waypoint along their route.

For example, "United XXX, turn left one-two-zero, when able, direct SPARTA."

In this case, the heading of 120 will put the aircraft on more or less a direct route to the VOR called SPARTA, however, whenever the pilots are able to pick up the VOR on their own, they are free to leave the ATC assigned heading and steer their own course to the VOR.

And finally, vectors are commonly used by ATC for aircraft spacing as well.  

"United XXX, turn right 090, vectors for spacing around traffic during the climb."
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Regards, Peter
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digger
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« Reply #19 on: February 23, 2006, 09:44:40 PM »

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Just pulled that, so really using that word in our case is it's own meaning and not so much as the mathmatical term that digger mentioned.


My point was that mathematicians and physicists were using the term while Orville and Wilbur were still bicycle mechanics, and it meant exactly what it still means in both cases. No adaptation was required to make it a useful term for the control of air traffic. (Otherwise, somebody would've had to concoct yet another acronym.)    Smiley
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n57flyguy
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« Reply #20 on: February 24, 2006, 09:58:11 AM »

Thanks alot guys, that makes alot more sense now that I think about it. I havn't started my flight training quiet yet so I not sure what some stuff is yet. Thaks again.
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