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Author Topic: BUTTE, Montana Plane Crash  (Read 31556 times)
SJ30
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« Reply #60 on: March 26, 2009, 12:58:54 PM »

I'd classify that report as pure nonsense. How would anyone know?

Autopsy.
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joeyb747
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« Reply #61 on: March 26, 2009, 07:10:54 PM »

I'd classify that report as pure nonsense. How would anyone know?
However, that aspect is being looked into. The latest :

BUTTE, Mont. -Authorities investigating a plane crash that killed 14 say an autopsy on the pilot's body could reveal whether a medical emergency was at fault.
However, Butte-Silver Bow County Coroner Lee LeBreche cautioned that a complete autopsy may be impossible because of the violent nature of the crash. The autopsy was under way Wednesday.

No offense SJ30, but read the last line of the post I quoted, from "however" on.
I'm not sure we will ever know what happened.
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kea001
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« Reply #62 on: March 26, 2009, 07:22:32 PM »

Associated Press reported that the pilot crashed 'short' of the runway. Considering the orientation of the cemetery, it looks like he overshot it.


from KRON4 (San Francisco t.v. station)

"According to National Transportation Safety Board Keith Holloway, there were seven adults and seven children aboard the single-engine prop plane that crashed in Holy Cross Cemetery in Butte about one-quarter to one-half-mile short of Runway 33."

                                                                   ###

Note: The cemetery is halfway down the runway. You can't land in the cemetery and land short, unless you ty to land perpendicular.

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from Montana Standard

  • It originated from Redlands, Calif., Municipal Airport on Sunday. It stopped at Nut Tree Airport in Vacaville, Calif., and Oroville, Calif., to pick up additional passengers.
  • In Vacaville, the pilot added 128 gallons of fuel, probably topping off his 400-gallon tank, enough to fly for more than three hours.
  • It departed from Oroville at 12:10 MST with a destination of Bozeman. Summerfield listed Butte in the flight plan as an alternate landing site.
  • At 1:59 p.m., the pilot contacted Salt Lake City’s Air Traffic Control center to request a destination change to Butte.
    He did not give a reason. Rosenker (NTSB) said the plane was cleared for a landing in Butte.
  • The plane moved to a lower altitude and again at 2:05 p.m. again requested the diversion to Butte.
    Again it was granted, and at 2:27 p.m. Salt Lake City Air Traffic Control asked the pilot if he had the airport in sight.
  • Summerfield (pilot) indicated “he had one more cloud to maneuver around,” according to Rosenker.
  • One minute later, the pilot reported he had visual confirmation of the airport.
  • Two minutes later, the Air Traffic Control attempted to contact the plane and received no response.
  • By 2:33 p.m., the Butte-Silver Bow Sheriff’s Office had received numerous calls about the crash.
  • Rosenker said initial witness reports say the nose pitched down about 90 or 95 degrees before impacting the ground.
  • He said he talked with one witness with aviation experience who said the plane was “west of the runway, west of the runway centerline and too high to land.” The witness said he saw the plane bank to the left, fly further west, roll, pitch down and descend out of view.
  • There is no air traffic control at Bert Mooney Airport, but a local fixed-base operator was monitoring the radio. He heard the pilot call “final approach for runway 33” just before hearing the crash. The wreckage was found less than a mile from that runway.

http://www.helenair.com/articles/2009/03/24/state/55st_090324_buttefolo.txt

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Note: So considering where the plane landed and the witness statement, it looks like he missed his approach. Then he crashed.

Google map - Butte, Montana
« Last Edit: March 26, 2009, 07:48:28 PM by kea001 » Logged
joeyb747
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« Reply #63 on: March 26, 2009, 08:30:58 PM »

From kea001s' post:
"The witness said he saw the plane bank to the left, fly further west, roll, pitch down and descend out of view."

So if I am reading this correct, the witness saw the airplane "ROLL", and "PITCH DOWN", like the airplane was inverted, and pitched towards the ground?? Do we know for sure the attitude of the airplane just before the crash?


Landed short?? That makes no sense at all. I concur with the missed approach theory. Possibly tried to make to sharp of a turn for the load on the airplane, destabilized the airframe, and lost control.

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kea001
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« Reply #64 on: March 26, 2009, 08:34:38 PM »

From kea001s' post:
Do we know for sure the attitude of the airplane just before the crash?

"Initial reports indicate the plane was flying at 300 feet."

Partial timeline of Montana plane crash
http://www.mercurynews.com/news/ci_11978587

Possibly tried to make to sharp of a turn for the load on the airplane, destabilized the airframe, and lost control.

I wouldn't think he would have made a sharp turn BECAUSE of the weight. Considering his experience, one would think he would have gone straight on through and made a wide turn after the runway.
« Last Edit: March 26, 2009, 08:43:27 PM by kea001 » Logged
joeyb747
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« Reply #65 on: March 26, 2009, 09:37:44 PM »

From kea001s' post:
Do we know for sure the attitude of the airplane just before the crash?

"Initial reports indicate the plane was flying at 300 feet."

Partial timeline of Montana plane crash
http://www.mercurynews.com/news/ci_11978587

Possibly tried to make to sharp of a turn for the load on the airplane, destabilized the airframe, and lost control.

I wouldn't think he would have made a sharp turn BECAUSE of the weight. Considering his experience, one would think he would have gone straight on through and made a wide turn after the runway.


I was actually referring to the attitude of the airplane, wether the airplane was inverted or not.

I would hope that he would not have made a sharp turn strictly based on the weight of the load...but this seems like a stabilization upset. The crash site was adjacent to the runway, about half way down, like he missed the approach, and attempted to turn back to the left (west) for another approach, and misjudged the turn.
Maybe I'm off base here...I am not totally failure with the performance envelope of the Pilatus.
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kea001
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« Reply #66 on: March 26, 2009, 09:59:59 PM »

Sorry. Should have sprung for the bifocals.

Something else I just thought about. I found this on flightaware.

Remarks
DEER IN VICINITY OF AIRPORT.
http://flightaware.com/resources/airport/KBTM

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Plane kills deer on Bert Mooney runway
The Montana Standard - 11/18/2005

"A SkyWest airplane ran over and killed a deer on the runway at the Bert Mooney Airport after landing around 11 p.m. Wednesday.

“It is a serious event,” said Rick Griffith, the airport’s manager. “We try to avoid that, and we take steps to avoid it. But our fence is 7-feet high, and deer can jump the fence.” Griffith is unsure how the deer got onto airport property. In some areas, it has been replaced with 8-foot high fence, but the airport cannot afford to replace five miles of the airport’s fence line.

Deer are especially hard to keep off airport property, but all kinds of animals can be a nuisance, Griffith said. The last time an airplane hit a deer at Bert Mooney was about 15 years ago.

http://www.mtstandard.com/articles/2005/11/18/newsbutte/hjjeiiibjbjbfe.txt


« Last Edit: March 26, 2009, 10:28:10 PM by kea001 » Logged
joeyb747
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« Reply #67 on: March 26, 2009, 10:05:41 PM »

Sorry. Should have sprung for the bifocals.

 grin I'm getting there too!  grin
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KSYR-pjr
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« Reply #68 on: March 27, 2009, 11:37:45 AM »

Avweb is reporting today that there is still no working theory at this point about this crash and that the investigators are focusing in the reason for the diversion as a starting point in the investigation:

NTSB: "No Working Theories" In PC-12 Crash Investigation

The article states that there was no stress in the pilot's voice when he requested the diversion nor was an emergency declared, which again implies that the reason for the diversion was not mechanical in nature.

Here is an idle, probably regrettable thought I had today about this accident given the facts, most notably the location of the accident in relation to the runway and the pilot's military background.  What about the idea that this was an overhead break maneuver gone awry?

There are perfectly legitimate reasons for overflying an airport before entering the pattern to land and the military uses the overhead break as a way to combine inspecting the runway with ensuring the aircraft can reach the runway at all times while on a visual approach.   This airport has an AWOS so unless it was unavailable it seems unlikely the pilot would have overflown the airport for wind direction assistance alone.
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Ion the Sky
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« Reply #69 on: March 28, 2009, 08:39:37 AM »

I have a question, i haven't really been following aviation news until somewhat recently (about November). Is it common for this amount of plane crashes to occur in such a short span of time? I mean so far there's been (In no particular order) The Turkish plane crash, the smaller (Angel flight I believe?) crash in Massachusetts, the Buffalo crash, the Hudson crash, the small plane crash off of Australia, and now these two. (I'm probably missing some too)  Is this ordinary huh
Also try FAA.gov under Data and Research
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Ion the Sky
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« Reply #70 on: March 28, 2009, 09:45:56 AM »

Pretty guttsy move to do an overhead in a PC12 with a load of pax (if that were the case). Anyone ever see the video of a B52 doing an overhead maneuver at Fairchild AFB, stalling the wing and nosing it in?
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joeyb747
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« Reply #71 on: March 31, 2009, 07:52:21 PM »

Pretty guttsy move to do an overhead in a PC12 with a load of pax (if that were the case). Anyone ever see the video of a B52 doing an overhead maneuver at Fairchild AFB, stalling the wing and nosing it in?



Was this the vid you were referring to? Pretty shocking.
« Last Edit: March 31, 2009, 08:05:55 PM by joeyb747 » Logged

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