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| | |-+  egll- great feed
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Author Topic: egll- great feed  (Read 19555 times)
ramnj
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« Reply #15 on: January 19, 2006, 07:25:23 PM »

I couldn't believe we where getting EGLL !!

Sadly no more...thanks to all concerned who made this little bit of heaven available...at least for a while.

Thanks especially to Dave for being sensitive and responsive to foreign govts regulations...even though they are a little too conservative.

regards,
Rick
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Javiation
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« Reply #16 on: January 19, 2006, 07:36:51 PM »

Quote from: airbus342
It is not illegal to just listen to ATC in the UK as long as the information is not passed onto anyone else so rebroadcasting is in that category and is therefore illegal (sadly) as th enew feed is very good quality. Hopefully this law will be repealed although I can't see it happening.  Sad


As mentioned by reevery I'm afraid you are wrong to suggest "Its OK as long as you don't pass it along".  It is an often quoted stance that was (is) also often used when referring to the emergency services but the bottom line, whilst owning any receiver regardless of coverage is not an offence in the UK listening to such transmissions is sad

Go to any airfield or airshow and you would be hard pressed to think that is the case - airband listening is generally tollerated by all parties but at times discression is needed (and advised).

The Radio Communications Agency (or Ofcom as they are now part ) information sheet RA169 states:

    This means that it is illegal to listen to anything other than general
    reception transmissions unless you are either a licensed user of the
    frequencies in question or have been specifically authorised to do so by a designated person. A designated person means:

    the Secretary of State;
    the Commissioners of Customs and Excise; or
    any other person designated for the purpose by regulations made by the Secretary of State. [/list:u][/i]

http://www.ofcom.org.uk/static/archive/ra/publication/ra_info/ra169.htm

The EGLL link was mentioned on quite a few aviation/spotting related groups earlier today which probably hastend its awarness to those less appreciative sad
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--
Cheers
JC
Take your listening to a new dimension with the SBS-1 "Real Time Radar" for Mode-S/ADS-B equiped aircraft.
http://www.javiation.co.uk/sbs-1.html
philly
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« Reply #17 on: January 20, 2006, 10:35:18 AM »

I have just read that and it says you can listen to navigation broadcasts.

Which i think would come under airband.

I mean they sell airband radios in the airport shop at the airport.

plus plane spotters always use them freely in the airport and outside. i didnt read anywhere on that link where it says you cant just listen to them.

it says you can listen to navigation broadcasts amd i thought planes use atc for navigating. cheesy
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The Hoffspatcher
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« Reply #18 on: January 23, 2006, 07:52:02 AM »

That LHR feed was fantastic ....  real bummer they killed it  cry

The "my tax pays for the air traffic system therefore I own it and can listen to it" works well in most places, and maybe one day it'll be the same in the UK

But until then we'll all have to sit at LHR with our scanners and watch as the planes circle the Bovingdon hold  Smiley
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Ben Hoffman; BAv, ADX
Trust your Dispatcher!
marcoleon
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« Reply #19 on: January 25, 2006, 01:23:44 PM »

Quote from: reevery

Sadly, you are mistaken. In the UK it is illegal to even listen to something which isn't intended for you.

In the US, they encourage pilots to listen to the frequency to gain better situational awareness. I quote the FAA's AIM:
4-2-2. Radio Technique
a. Listen before you transmit. Many times you can get the information you want through ATIS or by monitoring the frequency.

Who's to say what the intended audience is?
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55brianb
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« Reply #20 on: March 08, 2006, 10:34:46 AM »

Quote from: philly
I have just read that and it says you can listen to navigation broadcasts.

Which i think would come under airband.

I mean they sell airband radios in the airport shop at the airport.

plus plane spotters always use them freely in the airport and outside. i didnt read anywhere on that link where it says you cant just listen to them.

it says you can listen to navigation broadcasts amd i thought planes use atc for navigating. cheesy


I've been pressing Ofcom for some time now for a definition of "navigation broadcasts" ever since I was forced to take my Heathrow and Gatwick feeds off, and finally I received the following yesterday:

"There is no precise legal definition in law of what is meant by 'navigation broadcasts'. The authors of this information note were aiming to explain that in the case of maritime and aeronautical radio it is generally intended that some messages sent by some aero ground stations (eg By the NATS or individual airports) and some coastal radio stations (eg port controls or HM Coastguard) these messages are widely received. For instance messages about navigation hazards, search and rescue alerts, weather warnings and other similar general messages which are purposefully intended for widespread information are sent on specific channels (and are usually deemed by international treaty- eg by ITU or IMO- as intended for all maritime or aeronautical users."

That aside, does the Wireless Telegraphy Act actually cover this?  The definition of 'Telegraphy' as I've seen it relates to non-voice communications, eg mostly morse code.  In no definition have I seen mention or reference made to voice comms....

I'm waiting for my solicitor to return from holiday as I quite like the idea of legally challenging this nonsense.

Has anyone any idea of the penalties/fines involved if I were to start streaming again??

I had some dialogue with a high-ranking NATS official (and I do mean high-ranking) who contacted me saying he was all in favour of my streaming, and who couldn't see why it was a problem.  Unfortunately this isn't actually a subject for NATS; it's Ofcom's baby, so he couldn't assist.
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Breton
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« Reply #21 on: March 08, 2006, 04:55:36 PM »

Actually that decision was a very liberal decision not conservative.  Because I on the other hand am very conservative.
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