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Author Topic: KBOS emergency  (Read 3203 times)
rsacchet
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« on: September 23, 2005, 08:08:41 PM »

Listening KBOS Tower and just caught the tail end of Delta 1931 (BOS-LGA shuttle) with possible smoke landing on 4R.  They stopped on the runway and shut the engines and are getting a heat scan and inspection from ARFF.  All clear...I didn't catch the beginning of this on center or approach.  I picked up tower around 7:50pm EDT local.
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rsacchet
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« Reply #1 on: September 23, 2005, 08:18:59 PM »

Keep listening to KBOS tower at 8:16pm EDT local as Lufthansa gets confused and then yelled at by the controller.
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Jonathan_tcu
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« Reply #2 on: September 23, 2005, 09:51:53 PM »

Hmm..pilots and controllers disagreeing.  I often hear that during the evening, when pilots cannot read back an Atlantic crossing flight plan read back correctly, or if the pilots beg the controllers to have an adjacent sector controller approve a higher altitude.  Some controllers really make a big deal here in northern Ontario's airspace about blocked altittudes when really not necessary.
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FSS wannabe, just curious about stuff, that's all.
dave
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« Reply #3 on: September 23, 2005, 11:44:59 PM »

Quote from: Jonathan_tcu
Hmm..pilots and controllers disagreeing.  I often hear that during the evening, when pilots cannot read back an Atlantic crossing flight plan read back correctly, or if the pilots beg the controllers to have an adjacent sector controller approve a higher altitude.  Some controllers really make a big deal here in northern Ontario's airspace about blocked altittudes when really not necessary.


How do you know it's not necessary Jonathan?
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Jonathan_tcu
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« Reply #4 on: September 24, 2005, 06:30:36 AM »

Sometimes the  altitude block could be a result of turbulence, or a way to keep away from either cloud ceilings or cloud tops when unexpected.  Some controllers, not necessarily anal, but I can see them scratching their heads as to why a pilot would request that in perfect VFR and turbulence-free altitudes.  One Toronto controller approved a block for a pilot near Moosonee heading east to Quebec's airspace.  When he hotlined Montreal ctr, the Montreal controller had to know the reason for the block.  The guy from Toronto said he didn't care, but Montreal had to know.  Some controllers won't ask and approve it, while others will tend to play 20 questions before approving that request.  I hear the Montreal high altitude approving this during 'turbulent' times.
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FSS wannabe, just curious about stuff, that's all.
Jason
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« Reply #5 on: September 24, 2005, 08:06:45 AM »

You haven't heard of "aviation golf" on dead legs!?!?!?

That's the spotr where pilots take a golf-ball or a crimpeled piece of paper and a coffee cup; the coffee cup is placed in the aft section of the cabin.  The pilot requests a block altitude, the autopilot goes off and then the game begins.  This is actually true, but most pilots don't do it unless they sense they have a "cool" controller.
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C172SP
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« Reply #6 on: September 26, 2005, 09:47:04 AM »

I don't characterize the clearance "negotiations" you hear as disagreement or antagonism. As pilots, we all love it when controllers have a good plan and execute it. When controllers can't give us what we ask for or when they want more info about why we're making a request., it's usually because it's not in their plan and it can be a big chore to amend their plan or to phone the next sector and ask them to amend theirs. There's usually a reason for everything.

I think usually controllers are friendly, accommodating people who really want to make pilots' lives easier. I recall flying back from Nantucket one busy afternoon and a Mooney asked to overfly the city of Boston at 3,000 feet for sightseeing. I thought to myself, "boy is he gonna get it." But the controller asked him to standby... checked with the next approach sector... and said, "Can you make it 6,500 feet?" Everyone wins.
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