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Author Topic: lax tower controllers  (Read 16696 times)
Chananya Freedman
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« on: October 30, 2008, 04:45:54 PM »

hello!  in the lax tower i assume that there are two tower frequency controllers, two ground frequency controllers, a clearance frequency controller, and many ramp frequency controllers.  i'm curious if my general information is correct and can someone get me more information on the parts of my assumptions that I might not be clear on.  thanks.

Chananya
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73's KI6YIL
Chananya Freedman
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« Reply #1 on: October 30, 2008, 04:54:46 PM »

Here is some info on LAX

http://www.airnav.com/airport/KLAX
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MathFox
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« Reply #2 on: October 31, 2008, 07:14:04 AM »

The ramp controllers could be located closer to their aprons, for a better view of what's going on there. The terminal buildings may block the view from the tower.
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tyketto
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« Reply #3 on: October 31, 2008, 01:29:44 PM »

The ramp controllers could be located closer to their aprons, for a better view of what's going on there. The terminal buildings may block the view from the tower.

IIRC, there aren't any ramp controllers at LAX. The outbounds from there contact the ground controller for the pushback.

BL.
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inigo88
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« Reply #4 on: November 03, 2008, 01:04:27 AM »

Haha on the contrary, almost every single alley (between two concourses) at LAX has its own airline operations-run Ramp frequency! I've seen several copies of the Jepp 10-9B page from different carriers with their ramp freqs, but wasn't able to find any on google. I was able to find this related document on the topic which includes the frequencies below:

      Alaska Ramp Tower (Taxilane D-10)  130.85

      American Ramp Tower (Taxilane C-10)  129.32

      Delta Ramp Tower (Taxilanes C-8 and C-9)  131.45

      United Ramp Tower (Taxilane C-7)  129.40

      United Ramp Tower (Taxilane C-6)  129.50

The one time I've flown into LAX I had a few hours to kill before my connecting flight, and I got a chance to sit in one of the restaurants looking out on the C-6 alley and listen to ramp control. In the following aerial photo you can see that the C-6 alley is actually split into two parallel center lines, one orange and one blue, ending with the large painted arrows at the hold short line to taxiway Charlie.

Every UAL/SKW flight in that alley would call ramp control on 129.5 to request push back and engine start. After the push back, the ramp controller would actually instruct the airplanes to taxi from their positions in the alley, up either the "orange line" or the "blue line" to one of the arrows holding short of taxiway charlie and then contact ground for taxi from there. Similarly, inbound arrivals would call ramp on their second radio prior to being outside the alley and get both their assigned gate and instructions to get there. For instance, I recall instructions going something like this: "Skywest 100 follow the orange line in to gate 80, use caution for the outbound 737 on the blue line."

Here's a Bird's Eye view of the entrance to the C-6 alley.

Considering its an airline operated position and not FAA air traffic control (since ramps are non-movement areas), communications on Ramp Tower and airline Operations frequencies can still be very interesting listening, and give the listener a new perspective on the bigger picture of how traffic flows at that airport.

I've certainly always appreciated feeds with these extra frequencies included. Smiley

Regards,

Inigo
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athaker
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« Reply #5 on: November 03, 2008, 11:31:54 AM »

I'm pretty sure both of you guys are right.  Those in the alleyway definitely contact their respective ramp controllers for push.  However, many gates at LAX are at the end of the concourses and require pushback onto active taxiways, like Charlie or Delta, and you'll hear them calling ground for push every once in a while. 

Correct me if I'm wrong, since I'm going purely based on the scanner I snuck through security, sitting at a coffee shop before my last flight out of LAX.
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Amante de Aviones
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« Reply #6 on: November 03, 2008, 08:46:26 PM »

I'm pretty sure both of you guys are right.  Those in the alleyway definitely contact their respective ramp controllers for push.  However, many gates at LAX are at the end of the concourses and require pushback onto active taxiways, like Charlie or Delta, and you'll hear them calling ground for push every once in a while. 

Correct me if I'm wrong, since I'm going purely based on the scanner I snuck through security, sitting at a coffee shop before my last flight out of LAX.

How do u mean snuck your scanner past security, i always get mine past and i fly twice a month
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inigo88
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« Reply #7 on: November 06, 2008, 11:42:31 PM »

Absolutely correct - Some of the gates at the ends of the concourse would need to push onto the movement area, and would need to contact LAX Ground prior to doing so. The ramp towers are there for the airline to regulate itself in the busier non-movement areas that ATC doesn't control, so from the ground controller's perspective the airplanes contact them prior to entering the movement area either way (whether it's the first call or after talking to a ramp controller). Additionally, based on the frequencies I was able to dig up previously I don't believe the D-9, D-8 or D-7 alleys  (Northwest & Southwest) are regulated by a ramp controller and they contact LAX North Ground directly.

Per the scanner vs. TSA subject, there's no reason to hide it from them. They're not responsible for enforcing most airline's company policy of no scanner use in flight (which I choose to respect despite the fact that most scanners emit minimal electromagnetic fields), and it's perfectly fine to listen to them inside the terminal past security. Should you be discreet? I choose to wear headphones as a courtesy to my fellow travelers, and keep the activity generally low key to be mindful of the fact that air travel can put some people on edge to begin with. I certainly don't hide it and act suspiciously, I just go about my business acting like I'm not doing anything wrong - because I'm not. Smiley

I've only had TSA ask me about it twice (traveling with multiple scanners). The first was at OAK about one of the detached "rubber-duckie" antennas in my bag, which had an interior wire that wrapped around in a corkscrew shape and resembled a bottle-opener on the X-ray. The TSA agent politely asked if he could take a look in the bag and then had a good laugh that it was an antenna. The second was a TSA agent at SAN, who after asking routinely whether I had any electronic devices in my bag, started wise-cracking about the degenerate type of people who listen to "police scanners." I advised him I was a licensed pilot and just wanted to listen to ATC to pass the time, and he apologetically shut right up... so no hard feelings.

People may challenge you on it, but just remember you're not breaking the law and are doing nothing wrong. You will be very successful traveling with scanners if you're open and forthcoming about it. If you try and "sneak" or hide them and act suspiciously, or break real rules (like monitoring in flight against company policy) - you may bring real and unnecessary problems on yourself.

Regards and good luck.

Inigo
« Last Edit: November 06, 2008, 11:44:31 PM by inigo88 » Logged
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