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| | |-+  New User with some questions for folks living in Sydney
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Author Topic: New User with some questions for folks living in Sydney  (Read 3039 times)
Zebski81
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« on: April 13, 2011, 03:59:29 AM »

Hey guys,
I am very new to this and absolutely love it!!! I live in Sydney and listen to the SYD international feed as where i live i have a good view of most flight paths in and out.
There is a couple of things that pilots and ATC will say that I just don't understand and cannot seem to find info on it.

One is when a flight is coming in for example and they will say for example "QANTAS 452 heavy" what do they mean when they say heavy as not all say this. Does it mean they are fully loaded and need a longer runway??
(Sorry if i sound really dumb here complete newbie like i said)
And the other thing is when they are on approach they will be directed by ATC to do a direct sausage?Huh What does that mean?
Hope someone can help.
Cheers
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alltheway
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« Reply #1 on: April 13, 2011, 04:38:50 AM »

The heavy means the airplane is over a certain weight causing more wake turbulence.

The sausage is possibly a waypoint, or final fix on their approach...
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K5PAT
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« Reply #2 on: April 13, 2011, 09:56:02 AM »

Looking at the approach plate for ILS runway 34L for Sydney,  SOSIJ is an initial approach fix.  They probably pronounce it "sausage". 
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joeyb747
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Nothing Like A 747!


« Reply #3 on: April 13, 2011, 09:57:01 AM »

There are four classes of aircraft weights:
A. Super: The A380 is athe only aircraft to fall into this class as of right now.
B. Heavy: Aircraft capable of takeoff weights of more than 300,000 pounds.
C. Large: Aircraft capable of takeoff weights of more than 41,000 pounds, but less then 300,000 pounds.
D. Small: Aircraft capable of 41,000 pounds or less maximum certificated takeoff weight.

In the U.S., this just recently changed, with the reclassification of the Boeing 757 as a "Large" aircraft.

"Revised is made to harmonize FAA weight category standards with those of the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO). All aircraft with a maximum certificated takeoff weight of more than 41,000 pounds but less than 300,000 pounds maximum certificated takeoff weight will now be classified as a “Large” aircraft according to FAA standards. Aircraft with a maximum certificated takeoff weight of 300,000 pounds or more will now be classified as a “Heavy” aircraft according to FAA and ICAO weight classification standards.

This change reclassifies all B757 aircraft as “Large” aircraft; however, controllers are required to apply the special wake turbulence separation criteria as specified in paragraph 5-5-4. This change cancels and incorporates N JO 7110.525, Appendix A, Aircraft Information Fixed-Wing Aircraft, effective April 8, 2010."


From:

http://www.faa.gov/air_traffic/publications/atpubs/atc/EofCChange1.htm

http://www.faa.gov/documentLibrary/media/Notice/N7110.525.pdf

http://www.faa.gov/documentLibrary/media/document_change_proposals/N7110.525%20%20AppA.pdf

Aircraft are classed by the total amount of weight they are certified to takeoff with, even if the are not operating at that weight during any phase of the flight. Basically, an empty Boeing 747 is called a heavy just the same as a full one, for example.

Hope that helps!

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Aircraft Mechanic
acarsuser
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« Reply #4 on: April 13, 2011, 09:11:09 PM »

I lost my link for Australian Sids and Stars, and various other charts.  If I Googled for another hour I guess I will find it.   This may be over the head of a newbie today, but a couple of weeks from now maybe not.
You will soon hear 'cleared for the Boree 4 or Marlin 8 arrival.   You will not have ask what is that, if you see the charts.

For the Newbie, please listen to Australian Satellite feed.  It covers the major SYD/YSSY arrival plus MUCH More.

Good Luck.
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acarsuser
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« Reply #5 on: April 13, 2011, 10:10:47 PM »

I found the link

http://www.airservicesaustralia.com/publications/current/dap/AeroProcChartsTOC.htm#S
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atcman23
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« Reply #6 on: April 13, 2011, 10:19:17 PM »

In the U.S., this just recently changed, with the reclassification of the Boeing 757 as a "Large" aircraft.

Just to clarify this, the 757-200 was always a "Large" aircraft, but the 757-300 was a "Heavy" aircraft.  It was changed because many operators of the 757-200 were modifying their aircraft for longer range, thus sending their operating weight into the "Heavy" category.  Therefore, they eliminated the problem of (is that 757 a heavy?) by increasing the weight classification.  Separate wake turbulence separation still applies for the 757 regardless of series.
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Mark Spencer
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