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Author Topic: Not a good week for AMERICAN AIRLINES  (Read 6526 times)
bogman
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« on: February 25, 2008, 05:42:30 AM »

Found this sad story ..........Why does it always take a death or something like that to get something fixed or sorted out.



http://www.jetphotos.net/news/index.php?blog=1&title=woman-refused-help-by-flight-attendant-d&more=1&c=1&tb=1&pb=1


[url=http://]]]
http://www.jetphotos.net/news/index.php?blog=1&title=woman-refused-help-by-flight-attendant-d&more=1&c=1&tb=1&pb=1


http://http://www.ktvu.com/news/15397377/detail.html
« Last Edit: February 25, 2008, 06:48:05 AM by bogman » Logged
dorishd
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« Reply #1 on: February 25, 2008, 12:44:11 PM »

not taking sides, but the information given is from a family member. lets wait for the whole story to come out.
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Texas-Cat
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« Reply #2 on: February 25, 2008, 01:26:41 PM »

O2 (oxygen) is considered a prescription medication. A Flight Attendant should not make the medical determination that O2 should be administered to a passenger unless they are trained in emergency medical procedures. There are medical conditions where giving oxygen would actually be the completely wrong thing to do and could harm rather than help. Since a Dr confirmed in-flight that she had expired, I can only assume that he had taken charge of her care. As for the AED (Automated External Defibrillator) and the claim that it did not work, this piece of equipment automatically diagnoses whether there is a cardiac arrhythmia and administers a shock ONLY in that case.  I think the media is sensationalizing this incident and agree that we need to wait and see what the actual medical condition was before saying that the flight crew acted inappropriately.
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KSYR-pjr
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« Reply #3 on: February 25, 2008, 02:59:23 PM »

As for the AED (Automated External Defibrillator) and the claim that it did not work, this piece of equipment automatically diagnoses whether there is a cardiac arrhythmia and administers a shock ONLY in that case.  I think the media is sensationalizing this incident and agree that we need to wait and see what the actual medical condition was before saying that the flight crew acted inappropriately.

Good call.  A quote from a CNN article just released.

"Wilson said the defibrillator was used but that the machine indicated Desir's heartbeat was too weak to activate the unit.
An automated external defibrillator delivers an electric shock to try to restore a normal heart rhythm if a particular type of irregular heart beat is detected. The machines cannot help in all cases."
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Regards, Peter
ATC Feed:  Syracuse (KSYR), NY
airdale39
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« Reply #4 on: February 25, 2008, 05:07:08 PM »

Texas-Cat
     I agree with you that Oxygen is a medically prescribed drug, but it is not something that should only be administered by a Emergency Medical person.
     Obviuosly this person was Cyanotic at the point that they were caring for her, and no matter who you are or where you are, if this condition is obvious, and you have a cylinder of oxygen at your disposal, then oxygen is the immediate thing that should have been given to her.
    I am a retired Registered Respiratory Therapist, and fully understand the complications of Oxygen in high dosages knocking out the respiratory drive, but at the point she was, she did not have a chance without immediate oxygen therapy.
    It is indeed sad that this happened, and the manner in which it was handled is yet to be determined.
    My condolences to this family.
                                           Ron
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Texas-Cat
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« Reply #5 on: February 25, 2008, 06:05:06 PM »

I am a retired Registered Respiratory Therapist, and fully understand the complications of Oxygen in high dosages knocking out the respiratory drive, but at the point she was, she did not have a chance without immediate oxygen therapy.
 
Pls don't misunderstand - My point is that it is dangerous to have persons that are not trained in medical diagnosis making treatment decisions. I won't even go into the liability issues for the airlines. You have medical background so you would have been better equipted to diagnose the situation that the average flight crew. I haven't read anywhere that she was cyanotic only that she complained to her family of respiratory distress. I believe that it was originally reported to the flight crew that "she was diabetic and needed O2". (Once again referring to the CNN article)The flight crew was absolutely correct that administering O2 is not indicated in either hyperglycemia or in the more common occurance of hypoglycemia. They did administer O2 after assessing that it wasn't a diabetic crisis and then immediately located qualified medical personnel to take over. It appeared to me that the crew did everything in their power to assist her. I believe that her family in their distress did not comprehend the situation correctly. My condolences also go out to the family for their loss.
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bogman
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« Reply #6 on: February 25, 2008, 06:51:27 PM »

I have one question     Does the FAA do an ivestigation or is it up to the airline?
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KSYR-pjr
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« Reply #7 on: February 25, 2008, 06:59:35 PM »

I have one question     Does the FAA do an ivestigation or is it up to the airline?

Based on my understanding I believe that because there was a death on a US airline the NTSB, who is responsible for investigating transportation-related deaths, would perform their version of an investigation.   Results of an NTSB investigation are not admissible in a court of law, however.
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Regards, Peter
ATC Feed:  Syracuse (KSYR), NY
bogman
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« Reply #8 on: February 25, 2008, 07:06:27 PM »

Thanks for clearing that up for me Peter
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athaker
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« Reply #9 on: February 26, 2008, 09:02:52 AM »

Are flight attendants first responder trained?  Since there's an AED on board, they probably at least have their CPR cert.

I'm an EMT in LA county so I often find myself wondering how effective the EMS system would be in various circumstances.  An aircraft is a nightmare for rapid response, in my opinion, because in mid-air, the nearest ER is a descent, landing, taxi, THEN an ambulance ride away.  Not good for critical patients... 
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airdale39
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« Reply #10 on: February 26, 2008, 03:41:43 PM »

Texas-Cat
    Extremely valid points in what you are saying, as far as the Diabetic situation, I can relate, as I am a diabetic.
    I was under the impression from an article that I read, that she was having extreme respiratory distress, so naturally my 30 years of experience told me that oxygen at 2 liters per minute by nasal cannula would not have harmed her, and could have even aleviated the panic she was probably in by knowing she was getting oxygen.
   But it's hard to evaluate, I'm here and they were there, I would have gotten her oxygen some how even if it was just for a way to ease her anxiety.
   You were right in pointing out what you did, and I by no way take any misunderstanding by you. And all that any of us that have compassion for her and her family can do is hope this can be resolved with dignity for all involved.
                        Thanks Texas     Ron
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NAplaya16-ATC
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« Reply #11 on: February 27, 2008, 07:07:41 PM »

Sad, Sad event!!!   when my ATC teacher told me about it this morning, i was completely baffled by it.    I also am wondering to how this will hit American Airlines, like how many lawsuits would come out of this and how much the airline will have to pay to settle everything involved with this catastrophe.

My deepest sympathies to all this person's family!!!

-NAplaya
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Fryy
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« Reply #12 on: February 27, 2008, 09:31:23 PM »

The media's story states that the oxygen tanks were empty on this flight, that was false. There were also two RN's onboard aswell as a doctor who were attending to the victim.
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airdale39
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« Reply #13 on: February 28, 2008, 05:40:05 PM »

FRYY,
     I agree, the E cyclinders or smaller are an integral part of the flight crews checkout procedures. The only way they would have been empty is if when someone checked  for the unit being full, they did not fully close the valve, which could have caused a small continual leak.
      I also heard that one of the doctors was upset because he could not attach the oxygen line to the ambu bag which is used to assist in breathing. This is confusing to me, because all ambu bags that I have ever used have had a connection for oxygen already attached to it.
      But I'm sure that all of the medical people onboard did the best they could with what they had, and maybe this sad incident will get the airlines to better train their personel, and re-evaluate their onboard emergency carts contents.
      I give the doctors and nurses onboard a big thumbs up for their efforts.
                                           R
     
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moto400ex
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« Reply #14 on: February 28, 2008, 09:48:48 PM »

Yes it was ana extremely bad week for american airlienes. 

1)  The nose gear situation down in miami

2)  An American Airlines Boeing 767-300 had a hydraulics failure in flight in manchester.

http://jetphotos.net/viewphoto.php?id=6180825&nseq=0

http://www.jetphotos.net/viewphoto.php?id=6180868&nseq=3

3)  Now this lady died on an American Jet.
« Last Edit: February 28, 2008, 09:51:40 PM by moto400ex » Logged
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