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| | |-+  Open mics
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Author Topic: Open mics  (Read 11723 times)
Jonathan_tcu
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« on: November 28, 2004, 05:10:36 PM »

I listened to that KMCO and is actually quieter than expected.  While I was living in North Bay, monitoring the North Bay/Sudbury sector, at around 10:20 at night, one of the IFR guys from Toronto center locked his mic open.  All you heard him say was something like "Right, ok thanks, bye"  And he let out a huge exhale and started typing.  I've also noticed that on the Toronto freq for the Timmins-Cobalt sector on 128.3 that there is more background than the controller.  You hear other people yelling, laughing and other aircraft calling in on different radios.  Sometimes, the hotline is ringing like a sick meridian on low tone ringing.  I love it!  cheesy
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FSS wannabe, just curious about stuff, that's all.
kneecaps
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« Reply #1 on: November 28, 2004, 05:28:01 PM »

Hehe, sounds like a blast, i'll have to checkout Timmins-Cobalt.

One thing which really suprised me is how casual the comms are (on Boston Tracon at least), I hear a lot of non standard phraseology and comm procedures.
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Jonathan_tcu
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« Reply #2 on: November 28, 2004, 05:37:43 PM »

I've noticed the phraseology really varies based on location, traffic and approach type.  One term that I hear sometimes, but not often, is the procedure turn.  About the open mics though, I love it.  That way I get a sense of what type of work is going on in the center.  The only open mic with no modulation or dead carrier is Montreal center that we have here in Timmins on 133.97  Not often, but when it happens, it's just dead air with a high pitch whistle until the controller starts talking.
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kneecaps
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« Reply #3 on: November 28, 2004, 05:49:54 PM »

I think most approach procedures Ito busy airports are desgined to avoid requiring procedure turns to save time/money.

I've been trying to listen to the experimental Boston CTR stream but i never hear anything, must be because its experimental? Cheesy
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Jonathan_tcu
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« Reply #4 on: November 28, 2004, 06:00:21 PM »

Oh ok.  I didn't know that.  I would agree on the time saving idea with that.  If you know about approaches, could you tell me what effect the VOR/DME approach has on an aircraft?  I know the ILS is designed for poor IFR conditions on an approach.  I assume that VOR/DME is also and instrument approach?
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kneecaps
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« Reply #5 on: November 28, 2004, 06:43:11 PM »

Basically instrument approaches fall into two kinds of procedures:
Non-Precision: VOR,VOR/DME,NDB,GPS etc etc
Precision: ILS

Precision approaches have vertical guidance down to the runway whereas non-precision approaches do not.

Most commerical traffic will generally land with a precision approach ie: ILS when available even if the weather is crystal clear and calm.

In direct answer to your question though, a VOR/DME approach is a VOR non precision approach which requires the aircraft to have DME capabillities to perform the approach. Some VOR approaches have no DME requirement.

Checkout http://naco.faa.gov/digital_tpp.asp?ver=0407&eff=7-8-2004&end=8-5-2004

for the Instrument procedures for all your fav airports (um...assuming your in the US )
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Jonathan_tcu
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« Reply #6 on: November 28, 2004, 06:50:15 PM »

Ok.  I learned something new.  I always thought that during crystal clear VFR conditions, a straight- in without an ILS approach would be ok.  I suppose that's why I always hear aircrafts on approach at Toronto Pearson instructed  clear for an approach for the runway 23 ILS and when I check the metar, it's VFR.  I am in Canada by the way.  I also communicate with a VFR tower employee from Fairbanks AK who tells me  (more like corrects me) on these topics.  Thanks for that info.   cheesy
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kneecaps
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« Reply #7 on: November 28, 2004, 07:04:35 PM »

Yes, basically, to operate in Class B Airspace (US standards), you have to be on Instrument Rules, hence you can't have a visual approach.

Checkout
https://164.214.2.62/products/digitalaero/terminals/termindex.cfm?versionname=V0412&regionname=CANADA/

They have Canadian procedure charts there and procedures for the rest of the world.  They also have IFR enoute charts for everywhere except USA.
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Jonathan_tcu
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« Reply #8 on: November 28, 2004, 07:51:07 PM »

Hi there. Thanks very much for that link.  I don't understand how others can find the easiest web links and I can't.  I was able to open up that chart with my preview program to check out that plan.  My airport was not listed, but as long as Toronto is there, then I know more of what's going on.  

Speaking of Pearson, I'm monitoring the Toronto frequency and noticed that the Terminal unit controller is really non stop!  I assume because Toronto tower is electronic with no hand written flight plans, that the hand offs are all electronic instead of using the hotline.
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kneecaps
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« Reply #9 on: November 28, 2004, 07:55:33 PM »

Hehe, not quite so easy, I only got that link today off sombody else, it was one of the hardest to find, but one of the best. Have a look around for the NACO equivilent for Canadian airspace, its bound to have procedures for most of the airports.

I imagine that most large TRACONs are able to do electronic handoffs and such.
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Biff
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« Reply #10 on: November 28, 2004, 08:33:59 PM »

If you'd have been listening to SFB this morning you might have heard me with a stuck mic.  Wink

Thankfully I didn't say anything too embarrassing before figuring it out.
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kneecaps
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« Reply #11 on: November 29, 2004, 01:31:19 AM »

Quote from: Biff
If you'd have been listening to SFB this morning you might have heard me with a stuck mic.  Wink

Thankfully I didn't say anything too embarrassing before figuring it out.


Cheesy Are you a Pilot or a Controller?
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Jane G
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« Reply #12 on: November 29, 2004, 05:27:10 AM »

Another goof related to the stuck mic. Does anyone here monitor 121.5 MHz? I've caught a few unintended "in-flight" PA announcements (amongst others) being broadcast on this freq. One in particular lasted over 90sec. Such a shame because you just know that they have wasted their breath and will have to do it all over again. But funny anyway.
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Biff
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« Reply #13 on: November 29, 2004, 10:19:04 AM »

Kneecaps, I'm a private pilot.  The PTT switch was stuck down before I even started the airplane.  As soon as I switched on the radios I was broadcasting.  huh  I'm sure everyone had a good chuckle listening to me trying to talk with my passenger, wondering why the intercom wasn't working.

Jane, can't say I've ever heard that, but I'm going to have to start listening now.   Smiley
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drl5555
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« Reply #14 on: December 01, 2004, 04:24:42 PM »

Kneecaps, you're mostly correct with the different types of instrument approaches, but there's also something called a "Visual Approach." A visual approach is used in good weather conditions, and can only be assigned to IFR aircraft with either the airport or the traffic they're following in sight. A pilot "cleared for the visual" can decide what pattern to make and when to initiate a descent to the airport. This expedites traffic flow to an airport because there is no need to vector aircraft onto the localizer. So, in good  weather conditions a visual approach is most often used, unless other circumstances prevail.
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