Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?
October 23, 2014, 04:39:51 PM
Home Help Login Register      
News: NEW Follow LiveATC updates on Twitter and Facebook


+  LiveATC Discussion Forums
|-+  Air Traffic Monitoring
| |-+  Listener Forum (Moderators: dave, RonR)
| | |-+  Open mics
« previous next »
Pages: 1 [2] Go Down Print
Author Topic: Open mics  (Read 12391 times)
kneecaps
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 22


« Reply #15 on: December 01, 2004, 04:29:24 PM »

I know about Visual Approaches, however listen to Boston approach at practically any time of day and even in clear weather, 99% of aircraft (commercial carriers) will be cleared for ILS approaches.

The only kind of aircraft I ever hear being cleared visual is GA or smaller commuter type aircraft and its generally to a different runway to the one in use for ILS.

But at smaller airports visual approaches are very common indeed.
Logged
dave
Site Founder
Administrator
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 3663



WWW
« Reply #16 on: December 01, 2004, 04:52:45 PM »

This has a lot to do with the rules under which commercial carriers fly (both Part 135 and company rules).
Logged
kneecaps
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 22


« Reply #17 on: December 01, 2004, 05:07:37 PM »

Ah...that makes sense, I thought there must be some legal/regulatory reason for this.

I have read that you can file IFR but then request or specify a visual approach at your destination airport. Presumably this doesnt apply to carriers?

Can a commerical airliner ever land on visual?
Logged
PHL Approach
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 743



« Reply #18 on: December 02, 2004, 08:36:43 PM »

Yea, I've heard plenty Commercial Airliners take the visual. I think they may have to request it, unless the ILS is out......
Logged
AmericaWestCMH
Jr. Member
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 86


WWW
« Reply #19 on: December 02, 2004, 08:55:14 PM »

Unless the weather is marginally VFR here in Columbus, most if not all of the airliners get the visual.
Logged

drl5555
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 5


« Reply #20 on: December 04, 2004, 03:11:19 PM »

Yeah, commercial airliners can land on a visual approach, it happens all the time, and they do not need to request it. The fact that airliners use the ILS at Boston even in clear weather must have something to do with noise abatement or other local special procedures. It really depends on the specific airport.
Logged
dave
Site Founder
Administrator
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 3663



WWW
« Reply #21 on: December 05, 2004, 01:02:31 AM »

Quote from: drl5555
Yeah, commercial airliners can land on a visual approach, it happens all the time, and they do not need to request it. The fact that airliners use the ILS at Boston even in clear weather must have something to do with noise abatement or other local special procedures. It really depends on the specific airport.


They don't always use the ILS in clear weather...plenty of visual approaches by commercial airliners and bizjets in Boston.  The original poster has his facts a little bent out of shape.

Dave
Logged
n20295
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 1


WWW
« Reply #22 on: December 14, 2004, 08:43:58 PM »

Quote from: kneecaps
Yes, basically, to operate in Class B Airspace (US standards), you have to be on Instrument Rules, hence you can't have a visual approach.
I'd like to correct you regarding IFR in Class B airspace.  
You are correct that an aircraft needs a "clearance" to operate in class B airspace, but that does note mean an instrument clearance.  It simply means a clearance into or through the class B airspace.  As a pilot you need to hear the words "N1234C is cleared into the Class Bravo Airspace"
If you listen in clear weather it is not uncommon to hear an aircraft on an instrument flight plan "cleared for the visual approach".  At Class B airports or others operating within class B airspace aircraft may not be given visual approaches due to the traffic volume.  By sequencing traffic onto the localizer or final approach course of an approach, the controllers have better control because those aircraft must follow prescribed instructions.  Visual approaches of aircraft are common at class C and other airport when the weather is VFR.  
If an aircraft on an instrument flight rules flight flies a visual approach they are still on an instrument flight plan until it is either cancelled by the pilot either in the air or on the ground at a non-towered airport or by ATC tower personnel upon touchdown of that aircraft.  So, a pilot who lands at a towered airport when the tower is open never has to remember to cancel his flight plan.
You may have confused Class B with Class A.  Class A is airspace from FL 180 to and including FL 600.  Any aircraft operating in class A airspace, reguardless of weather conditions must operate on an instrument flight plan.
Regards,
Mike
Logged
FWA2500
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 15



WWW
« Reply #23 on: December 19, 2004, 02:30:35 PM »

the otherday listining in on cleveland, there was a beech 1900 (if i heard correctly) having trouble with thier fuel mixture, i guess they forgot to switch off thier mic and i heard them telling thier copilot (i think) that they were going to have to turn back around and park to get it straitened out before taking off...... rolleyes then there was some conversation about what kind of oil to use? lol, was a bit confusing



anyong have a stream for cincinatti? im in oxford so the cinci aproach/dep. would cover oxford......wouldnt mind listinging in without having to go to the airport...lol (they have speakers outside that are tuned to the freq...
Logged
FWA2500
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 15



WWW
« Reply #24 on: December 19, 2004, 02:34:14 PM »

scratch what i said about cvg...lol, i found that there was a new one on the list Cool
Logged
Jonathan_tcu
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 241


« Reply #25 on: August 04, 2005, 11:14:01 AM »

Quote from: drl5555
Kneecaps, you're mostly correct with the different types of instrument approaches, but there's also something called a "Visual Approach." A visual approach is used in good weather conditions, and can only be assigned to IFR aircraft with either the airport or the traffic they're following in sight. A pilot "cleared for the visual" can decide what pattern to make and when to initiate a descent to the airport. This expedites traffic flow to an airport because there is no need to vector aircraft onto the localizer. So, in good  weather conditions a visual approach is most often used, unless other circumstances prevail.


There is a problem with approving visual approaches from ATC in non-radar environments.  I've posted this before, where ATC is no longer able to allow aircraft w/ visual approaches and I often here * I can't see you so I can't approve a visual, but I can approve a contact approach*
Logged

FSS wannabe, just curious about stuff, that's all.
Pages: 1 [2] Go Up Print 
« previous next »
Jump to:  


Login with username, password and session length

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.20 | SMF © 2011, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!