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Author Topic: Want to learn about planes  (Read 17037 times)
Fra
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« on: March 18, 2006, 07:07:09 AM »

Hi guys, this is a great site that I spend every single spare moment watching and listening to the feeds. Well, I am a great airplane entusiast, but unfortunately I really don't recognize most of the planes. (I would only for sure recognize B737, 747, Tu154, and that's about it. Sad

So, I am determined to learn how to recognize them (I've met people that recognize the aircraft by the sound, and you can imagine if they see it.)

So, do you have any tips to give me on how I can do this? Thanks to everybody who would wish to help me.

And one final question. What's the difference between a DC-9 and a Fokker 100?

Seems exacly the same to me!

Cheers!
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davolijj
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« Reply #1 on: March 18, 2006, 08:41:14 AM »

The most obvious difference I know between the F100 and DC9 is the "bumps" on the tail of the F100.  I've been told that these have something to do with the thrust reversers and they seem to stand out.

As for recognizing other aircraft trypes, spend some time around airports....you'll pick it up. Cheesy

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JD
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« Reply #2 on: March 18, 2006, 09:08:20 AM »

It's a little outdated by now, (latest version was published in 1992, I think), but check out "A Field Guide to Airplanes" by M.R. Montgomery and Gerald Foster.

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0395628881/104-0212430-0609567?v=glance&n=283155

The format seperates the aircraft by configuration--twin engine jets, four engine jets, biplanes, etc., so it's easy to check out the identifying characteristics that distinguish between two similar looking aircraft. It's not an encyclopedia by any means, but as a quick reference, it's more than adequate.
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Fra
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« Reply #3 on: March 18, 2006, 09:10:49 AM »

Thanks guys, it's a great help.
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mattkbdl
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« Reply #4 on: March 18, 2006, 04:02:41 PM »

I think the windows are a good attribute too.  For example, the eyebrow windows on the DC-9 series and some of the 737s.  Theres obviously other things but those are just some of the small parts I look at.
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Fra
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« Reply #5 on: March 18, 2006, 06:24:14 PM »

Nice thinking mattkbdl! Anybody else with some good tips?
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PHL Approach
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« Reply #6 on: March 19, 2006, 12:42:56 AM »

Philly used to get AAL F100's, but of course they retired them a while back. One thing to look at is the nose, it's very distinct. No where close to a DC-9's nose. It's much more round. Even the way the fuselage transitions to the top. Just above the flight deck windows.
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n57flyguy
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« Reply #7 on: March 19, 2006, 09:08:33 AM »

Aircraft can be determaned by noise, You can tell distictions between the sounds of Airbus and Boeings. It is also the engines. Some people can tell the difference between a PW and a RR on a 757. Older aircraft like the 727 and the 737-200 have a kind of wine to the engines. Once you become a more expierenced spotter, you'll catch on quick just by the engine noise.

As for looks, Boeing aircraft can easilly be determained, even from the air. B757s have a more slender nose than other aircraft, a 757 looks "Determaned" to me, thats my nickman for it. From the air a 757 has a shorter wingspan compared to the lenght of the fusalage. You can tell a 767 from a 777 simply because its longer and bigger, from the air, its a bit more difficult. A 747, its just got 4 engines and a double deck, high cockpit and its just huge.

737s, these are harder. Older 737-200s have different engines, they are smaller and more attached to the wing. on 200s the cockpit windows are a bit different to. The 300/400/500 are the trickey ones. Dont let the higher the number, the bigger confuse you. The 300 is the longest, the 500 is a bit shorter, and the 400 is the shortest. they dont have wingtips, like the NG. the 6/7/8/9 73s can be difficult to. the 6/7s early modles dont have wingtips, but the latter 7s do. the 8s and 9s both have wingtips and the 9 is longer than the 8.

As for MD, DC, and Airbus, I don't know to much about, but I can tell the difference between a DC and MD from the wingspan. Airbus are just ugly and have stange winglets that go up and down. Airbuses under bellys are different to.

Get some good books about Airliners, check out pictures of them on airliners.net and youll be good in no time. Also, youll get to know what type of aircraft fly for each airline. Once you get good, you can tell the most little details betweem aircraft.

If you want to know more about Bussiness aircraft I'm here just tell me and I would be glad to help.

Paul
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Fra
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« Reply #8 on: March 19, 2006, 09:37:11 AM »

Thanks Paul that's a great help! Yeah, I've downloaded lots and lots of videos from Flightlevel350 and I see a lot of pictures on airliners.net. The thing is I live near an airport, but it's not busy at all. Today there were only 2 departures and 2 arrivals (one in 5:30am and the other in 11:30am) I saw the later one (It was a b737-300). I go there almost every day but sometimes there aren't flights for over a week or so. Sad

There are only 3 or 4 airliners that fly to this airport, so the planes are quite easy to learn, but most of them are DC-9s and Fokker 100s so that's not much of a attraction. The last week was all F100 and DC-niners so today the 737 was a blast! It made a huge roar compared to the other ones.

Well, I've read that persistance pays so I won't give up.
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n57flyguy
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« Reply #9 on: March 19, 2006, 10:25:54 AM »

Good old Boeing roar! like a muscle car! I grew up around Boeing, My dad an engineer there in WA, I went past there alot and seeing the new shiney jets role out of the factory, a real plessure to see them.

Sounds like a slow airport, what field is it? How big is it?

yes don't give up! Again, if you want some more help, just ask.

Paul
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stealth71
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« Reply #10 on: March 19, 2006, 11:29:54 AM »

Welcome aboard. Learning to recognize planes is a lot of fun, and it only takes time. For example, a 737 and an Airbus A320 look similar from a distance airborne, but as one or the other gets closer, they take on distinctive differences, including fuselage design. For example, the A320, and most narrowbody airbus planes, have small winglets protruding both up and down, 737s don't, except for the models Paul mentioned that have huge winglets that rake upwards. 767's don't have winglets, except for the -400 model, in which they rake backwards, very unique. I've found that on some Mcdonnel Douglas planes, I can tell what it is by the flashing of the wingtip strobe lights, especially the newer MD11's. As for small planes, such as Cessnas, it can come down to just the shape of the windows. And you're right, some people can tell the plane by the sound of the engine. I work at an airport, so I can definitely tell if there is a Canadair regional jet taking off or an Airbus A300 simply because all the Airbus planes use engines that produce a distinctive whine when they spool up. I think it just takes time. One suggestion is to go back to airliners.net and rather that look at the photo's, look at the top of the homepage and there is a button that says "A/C Data", or just click on this link to go right to it.

http://www.airliners.net/info/

From there you can select your planes from the list. I'd start with the most common planes 717,727,737,747,757,767, 777, all the Airbus planes A318, 319, 320, 321, 300, 310, 330, 340, then all of the former McDonnell Douglas planes including the DC9, DC10, MD11, MD80, MD83, MD87, MD90.  Take a look at the good old L1011 Tristar as well. Once you're familiar with those, you can start to branch out to the other types of planes. Any questions, just ask. On a sidenote, I had a Delta 737-800 come in last night that the pilot claimed needed to be de-iced. Don't know why, it was about 50 degrees out, but nonetheless I de-iced his plane, and I have to tell you, a 737 is one cool looking plane when you're hanging about 30 feet above it. It's a view you don't usually get to see, and I wish I had a camera. Hey, I also just remembered, if you want, go to my website at flymissoula.com. I have several catagories of planes in the media gallery where you can see what some different planes look like. If you use Internet Explorer, place your cursor over the photo for information.
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Chris Hart
Missoula International Airport (MSO) live feed.
http://www.liveatc.net/search/?icao=kmso

Ham Call: KE7MH
Fra
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« Reply #11 on: March 19, 2006, 12:26:25 PM »

I can't really tell you how much helpful this is guys. Thank you a lot.

I live nearby a very quite airports, today there were 2 departures and two arrivals, and the next one is in Friday (5 days from today) and there is only one arrival scheduled. I live in Ohrid, Macedonia and the airport has only one runway. I counted from the monthly schedule for arrivals/departures there are about 24 flights a month (only Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays). There are a lot more if the airport from the capital, Skopje get closed for weather. (Happens every once in a while)

From the official page from the airport I got this

IATA Code:       OHD   
ICAO Code:       LWOH   
City:                OHRID
Fuel grades:       JP-1
Refueling facilities:    2 truck cisterns capacity 25 000 liters each
Seasonal availability:    All seasons
Runway (RWY) Designation:       02/20
RWY Dimension:       8366 x 147 ft   
RWY Surface:       ASPH   
RWY Strength:       PCN 76/F/B/X/T   
RWY Shoulders:       8.2 ft from both RWY edges   
Strip:       8956 x 460 ft
Declared RWY distances :
TORA    8366 ft
TODA    8366 ft
ASDA    8366 ft
LDA       8366 ft
Apron Dimension:
787 x 267 ft  (the old part of the Apron)
590 x 377 ft  (the new part of the Apron)    
Apron Surface:    ASPH    
Apron Strength:   LCN 56, h = 30 inches.   
Parking positions: 13
PSN Nr. 1,2,3,4:                         MAX 116 ft wing span
PSN Nr. 5,6,7,8:                         MAX 113 ft wing span
PSN Nr. G1,G2,G3,G4,G5:          General aviation, MAX 40 ft m wing span
Taxiways (TWY):
A, B (from RWY to Apron)
C, D (on the Apron)   
TWY Width:    75 ft   
TWY Surface: ASPH

I was considering to become a feeder for the site (since I live about 4 nm from the airport, in a 7 floor building, probably putting up an antenna on the top would be just fine) I postponed it because it's such a quiet airport so probably nobody would listen to it. But it's still an option.

Anyway, this has been a great help, I won't stop taking pictures and see videos until I really get it to it.

Cheers!
« Last Edit: April 23, 2010, 05:50:31 PM by Fra » Logged
stealth71
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« Reply #12 on: March 19, 2006, 12:29:34 PM »

One other idea. If you have good eyes or binoculars, jot down the airliners tail number. Then do a search for it on airliners.net. 99% of the time it will come up and you can find out exactly what it is.
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Chris Hart
Missoula International Airport (MSO) live feed.
http://www.liveatc.net/search/?icao=kmso

Ham Call: KE7MH
Fra
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« Reply #13 on: March 19, 2006, 12:42:58 PM »

That's also a good idea! I carry my binoculars in my car to see the tower or the planes taxing. First I wanted to take good pictures from the airplanes but after two weeks I haven't had much success. I have a 5.2M camera but I guess I'm just too far from the planes, the closest I can get is the fence. I don't know how to get as near on the runway as possible, because the pictures on airliners.net are really great, very close shots.

4 days ago I was right on the airport and it had been raining constantly for 4 days before, somehow me and my cousing got stuck in the mud (it was all the way around the fences) and it took us like 3 hours to get my car out of it. Smiley It was hilarious, I have couple of pictures, I'll put them so you can laugh, maybe in a while.
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Jason
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« Reply #14 on: March 19, 2006, 12:49:36 PM »

Quote from: stealth71
....Then do a search for it on airliners.net. 99% of the time it will come up and you can find out exactly what it is.


Good tip, Chris.  Another way to do it is search it through the FAA's N-number Database which will pull up the official registration information and can be more accurate than a.net at times.  Either way will get you the information, but the FAA's database is accurate.  While many a.net pictures are accurate, some are not.  It is still cool though to see a nice picture of the aircraft when you run the number through the a.net database cheesy

Jason
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