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Author Topic: IFR Rating Course  (Read 8528 times)
wampler24
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« on: August 31, 2009, 12:08:05 PM »

Hello again. I am working on getting my Instrument rating and now is the time to order a home study course. I used Gleim for my Private Pilot but was wondering if anyone has another suggestion out their for an IFR course. The Gleim was nice just a little boring. Also would like recommendations on Knee boards or chart holders and such... I am lacking int he organization area and find myself fumbling around a lot.

 I have 10 hours under the hood so far so I have a long way to go but for all you private pilots out there, I would highly recommend some hood time with an instructor because I HONESTLY believe that I am a better pilot than I was because I have learned holding altitudes and headings better... Not to mention my scanning of instruments is getting easier. Now I just really need to work on organizing all of my charts and such.

 
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Flyingnut
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« Reply #1 on: August 31, 2009, 02:05:08 PM »

I used the King Schools instrument study videos nine years ago.  I aced the written exam.  They are a bit expensive but I thought I retained more with a video course than with just written material.
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Marty
PPL - Instrument Rating
8 NW of KORD
dljone3
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« Reply #2 on: September 01, 2009, 05:08:02 PM »

I used the King Schools Cessna instrument course. I think they present the material in an easy to understand manner.
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captray
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G4 in Czech Republic


« Reply #3 on: September 01, 2009, 06:22:18 PM »

Personally I find the King's boring and hard to stay awake to. They do however cover all the material necessary and then some. I recommend to my students that they use the Jeppesen text book, the Gleim study guide and Rod Muchados instrument handbook. I have found that these 3 in combination work great and have had resulted in successful checkrides for my students.

As far as getting organized, save your money don't buy the fancy lap/chart/board/timer/LED/backlighted/etc. You get my point. Instead get a plain clipboard from your favorite office supply store. Get a clip with the flip over ears. Then, laminate your checklist on the back. Put your en-route chart (folded to your area) on the clip board. Use the other clip to hold your approach plates at the top right. This inexpensive trick really works!

Find a place in the plane to secure and extra pen or two. Also a pad to write down clearances.

Another tip, just remember the frequencies when you are given them, you will lose too much time trying to write them down.

Finally what I tell all my students. 'The instrument rating is the hardest of all, but it is also the most satisfying!'  Once you get it you can fly anywhere.

Good Luck and keep us informed as to your progress.
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Cancel the IFR~!
Flyingnut
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« Reply #4 on: September 02, 2009, 07:07:08 PM »

I agree with CaptRay's comment about all the fancy accessories.  The following link is for a Rod Machado video, IFR Flying Tips & Techniques.  In the video he talks about very inexpensive ways to organize your cockpit for IFR flying.  The video is chock full of other great IFR techniques too.

http://www.rodmachado.com/Product/Videos/videos.htm
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Marty
PPL - Instrument Rating
8 NW of KORD
ellejosh33
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« Reply #5 on: October 23, 2009, 12:16:12 AM »

To start out I am a CFII and have taught many instrument students. I have also flown for a regional airline(furloughed) and single pilot part135. My suggestions come from this experience base.
As far as what materials to use for your written and oral prep, it is based on your learning style. Each person has their way of learning. Some learn best from books where others need the reinforcement from visual such as video. With instrument training you need to maximize what you learn and retain. It is critical to get quality materials that will allow you to retain the knowledge in the long term memory. Shop around, think about what works best for you and find a suitable course that meets your particular learning style.
As far as organization I have found the Jeppessen IFR knee board is great. It is compact enough not to interfere with switches, yoke, etc yet will hold what you need. I would also suggest the IFR flight file. It will hold your plates and can clip into the knee board. It has a lot of very useful information printed in it and is organized in a way that enhances organization. You an find it at sporty's or any other aviation supply store.
I have had students who did and did not use a knee board and the flight file. By far the students who used them were much more organized and had a great deal less distraction.
Good luck with your training.
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ThirtyEcho
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« Reply #6 on: November 03, 2009, 02:27:19 AM »

Like you, I can't imagine flying without an Instrument Rating.

Always think three things ahead: what I'm now doing, what I am doing next and what to do after that.

As for an Instrument Rating course, my initial instrument school course was 47 years ago.

Try this, find yourself an ex Burma Hump pilot for an instructor.
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