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Author Topic: Training Phraseology  (Read 16145 times)
rodrigocampos
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« on: November 11, 2008, 08:00:18 AM »

Hi , my name is Rodrigo I'm 21 years old and I'm from Brazil. I'm commercial pilot and I have the ATPL theoric in my country as well . Now I'm in Australia learning and improving my English to do the ICAO Proficiency English test.  I would like to know what is the best way to learn about phraseology and conversation in english? And if somebody has an example? huh

Thank you

Rodrigo Campos
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MathFox
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« Reply #1 on: November 11, 2008, 08:43:26 AM »

Once you have a basic working knowledge of the language, the fastest way of learning is to go out among the "native speakers" and practice. For "aviation English" that would also mean communicating with ATC and pilots, talking to ground engineers, etc.

It would be very good for communication if you know all parts and assemblies of your plane in both Portuguese and English and also know the specific AIS/AIM terminology both ways.
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rodrigocampos
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« Reply #2 on: November 16, 2008, 09:41:12 AM »

Thank you so much , I am living with Australian students now and they are helping me. There is a airclub here and I will try to visit the tower and talk to the  air traffic controllers.

Thank you again

Rodrigo
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murena
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« Reply #3 on: November 17, 2008, 06:45:43 AM »

You know,Rodrigo,I'm not quite sure you'll be able visit tower.As far as I know only those who have special pass are permitted to enter those objects.At least we have such rules."We" means russian ATM.But it's good that you have an opportunity to improve your English communicating with native speakers.I am also for that kind of learning. But our government cannot afford it or just doesn't want.I work as a translator and teacher of the Aviation English at the same time.I teach  my AT controllers.They are to achieve the 4th level according to ICAO as fast as possible.But  I think it's difficult to do because everything is done in "artificial conditions".So,get the best from this education.And don't forget that ICAO demands not only knowledge of the phraseology but also general English.
Good luck!
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MathFox
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« Reply #4 on: November 17, 2008, 03:53:49 PM »

The policies for visiting a tower (or ATC centre) vary per country. In many places they'll be happy to see pilots and student pilots around; knowing how people work at "the other mike" breeds mutual understanding. Calling a supervisor to make an appointment is recommended; saying that you're "student pilots" helps.

Good luck and have fun!
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skyguard81
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« Reply #5 on: November 18, 2008, 05:03:39 AM »

Hi u can visit www.mypilotstore.com over there u will be enabled to have a look through some products like squawk VFR which will be good asset for u for sure .... wish u all the best and good luck.
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Robin Rebhan
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« Reply #6 on: December 07, 2008, 10:14:45 PM »

I rent out two rooms to student pilots attending KSCH. Most come here to learn English as well as learn to fly. Immersion in the language is a big help. Here in the USA, BOCES sponsors ESL course ( English as a second language ). The course is free. Correspondence Courses are also available ( usually to students returning home ) so they can maintain proficiency in English. Courses are available at public schools ( and other sites ) during the evening as Adult Education Course.
Taking college course are really a big help, even if only for a few credits, exposure to other students and social engagements are a very positive way to learn the language.
I enjoy the experience, find it rewarding and encourage others also to open their homes to student pilots from overseas.
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WILL WORK FOR FLIGHT TIME!
RENTERMAN
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« Reply #7 on: December 19, 2008, 06:52:40 PM »

Hola Rodrigo, I am Mexican so I understand your feeling very well, let me tell you that I´ve been in aviation since 1995 and I´ve never experience something as good as real life ATC for the practice, back then this was just a dream.
 If you keep listening A LOT of busy freqs for extended perdiods of time, Amigo you will educate your ears so well!  in the other side, we all know that talking in the radio is much harder than listening so In my particular opinion go and buy the "COMM1 radio simulator" VFR & IFR, great help, is interactive and you´ll hear yourself and laugh about your communications  in the biggining, but as far as you keep practicing you´ll be proud of your self.
 Make friends in a controll tower theý are normally excellent people who will teach you alot if you are humble enough to accept it.(sometimes pilots think we know everything, but sorry, we don´t)
 And at last, when I have a good time with my fellow pilots at home, we set the fire, the steaks, cold beers (not too much) and a loud speaker with a good congested ATC feed soundind back instead of music!!

Hope it is useful and have a great time down under!
Saludos!
José
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wweled
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« Reply #8 on: January 18, 2010, 10:47:43 AM »

I prepared and currently teach an Aeronautical English course in Argentina.
I bought every DVD and CD there is in sprotys and other pilot shops and they were of little help.

It is nice to hear the communications, like this webpage the help is incredible, but in order of passing the test you need to be able to communicate.

Listening is only 50% of the test, the other 50% is speaking, not only reading back, but also communicating different situations, to the tower, to operations and to the passengers.

My recommendation is to seek someone that knows the test very well.

let me give you a simple example that happened in my test.

I heard: flight 123 hold your position, there are horses on the taxiway"
after doing the read back (I was laughing, which made it more difficult) I was asked to invent a communication to my passengers, to the tower and to operations. I had to think what to say and simple speak in plain english.

another example,

they tell you that there is one big heavy passenger drunk in the main cabin, he is talking dirty and pushing people around. what would you do? how would you cope with the situation?

like you see, it is not only listen and repeat, it is also thinking outside the box and answer.

My best advice is for you to learn aeronautical english and just english before taking the test.
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ATCO_BRAND
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« Reply #9 on: January 21, 2012, 11:21:46 PM »

Ola Rodrigo,
Sou ATCO no Brasil e sugiro vc adquirir o seguinte material, a apostila da editora Macmillan "Aviation English", custa aproximadamente entre 70 a 110 reais, dependendo de onde vc comprar.
Esta apostila aborda todos os assuntos que vc poderá ver no Test da ICAO e é voltada tanto para ATCO como para Pilotos.

So long

ATCO-BRAND
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