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Author Topic: Transcievers / Recieves  (Read 9784 times)
scorpia54
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« on: February 21, 2009, 09:08:44 PM »

Hi There (first post)

I am a students pilot and have heard that some people carry a handheld radio of some description in their flight bag. So what are the differences between transcievers and recievers? And which model / features should I look for to purchase one to carry in my flight bag in the case of a radio failure? Also I would like to have it on my desk at home to listen to my local airport transmissions.

Is this normal things to do with them? Which models / brands would you guys suggest.
(Live in Australia)
Regards and thx
Jake
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scorpia54
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« Reply #1 on: February 25, 2009, 02:36:16 AM »

so no one has any advice on hand held radios?
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Flyingnut
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« Reply #2 on: February 25, 2009, 07:31:17 AM »

I have a Yaesu/Vertex Standard VX-210.  Very nice aviation transceiver.  Check out Icon.  They also make nice aviation transceivers.
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Marty
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« Reply #3 on: February 25, 2009, 08:50:26 AM »

Sorry for the late reply.   My advice is not so much on brand but on features.  Place a high importance on getting one that draws power from regular, non-rechargeable alkaline batteries.  Second on my feature list would be one that accepts the plugs from your aviation headsets.

My hand-held drew its power from a rechargeable battery.  Given that I would leave it in the airplane and that rechargeable batteries lose just about all their power over a month's time, I discovered it was never charged when I pulled it out to test it.   
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Regards, Peter
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Jason
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« Reply #4 on: February 25, 2009, 04:48:01 PM »

Sorry for the late reply.   My advice is not so much on brand but on features.  Place a high importance on getting one that draws power from regular, non-rechargeable alkaline batteries.  Second on my feature list would be one that accepts the plugs from your aviation headsets.

My hand-held drew its power from a rechargeable battery.  Given that I would leave it in the airplane and that rechargeable batteries lose just about all their power over a month's time, I discovered it was never charged when I pulled it out to test it.   


I have a Vertex Standard VXA-220 Pro VI transceiver with a rechargeable battery and I can go months without charging it, so I have the opposite experience. It usually sits in my car and allows me to pick up the ATIS from nearby airports as I pass by on my way to work. Not as sophisticated as Dave's car setup, but still works well.  smiley
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KSYR-pjr
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« Reply #5 on: February 25, 2009, 04:59:37 PM »

I have a Vertex Standard VXA-220 Pro VI transceiver with a rechargeable battery and I can go months without charging it, so I have the opposite experience. It usually sits in my car and allows me to pick up the ATIS from nearby airports as I pass by on my way to work. Not as sophisticated as Dave's car setup, but still works well.  smiley

When stocking an aircraft with a handheld it is very possible that it may be months before you pull it out to use it as a backup for real.  That is not the time in my opinion to discover the unit is not fully charged.  Hence, the fact that you can load your handheld with alkalines for the real deal is comforting.

Keep in mind also that it takes more power to transmit than it does to listen so what you judge as a fully charged handheld by its ability to receive may in fact be a unit unable to transmit clearly.  As with many lessons in life, I learned this lesson the embarrassing way by attempting one time to receive ATIS and then my IFR clearance with my handheld.   ATIS came in fine.  ATC hated my attempt to transmit and after a couple of "SAY AGAIN, YOU ARE UNREADABLEs" I was told to call back with a functioning radio.   embarassed



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Regards, Peter
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Jason
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« Reply #6 on: February 25, 2009, 06:54:55 PM »

When stocking an aircraft with a handheld it is very possible that it may be months before you pull it out to use it as a backup for real.  That is not the time in my opinion to discover the unit is not fully charged.  Hence, the fact that you can load your handheld with alkalines for the real deal is comforting.

Keep in mind also that it takes more power to transmit than it does to listen so what you judge as a fully charged handheld by its ability to receive may in fact be a unit unable to transmit clearly.  As with many lessons in life, I learned this lesson the embarrassing way by attempting one time to receive ATIS and then my IFR clearance with my handheld.   ATIS came in fine.  ATC hated my attempt to transmit and after a couple of "SAY AGAIN, YOU ARE UNREADABLEs" I was told to call back with a functioning radio.   embarassed

Touché.  I charge my transceiver up before I go flying so I generally don't run into that problem.  All good points though to consider, thanks for posting those. Smiley
« Last Edit: February 25, 2009, 06:58:20 PM by Jason » Logged
Flyingnut
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« Reply #7 on: February 25, 2009, 08:19:55 PM »

Since there is the battery discussion going on, I'll add a bit regarding my Yaesu/Vertex Standard VX-210.  It came with a rechargeable battery pack and also a battery pack holder in which alkaline batteries could be used.  I always charge up the rechargeable pack before flying, but also had the alkaline pack within reach in the aircraft.
« Last Edit: February 26, 2009, 07:16:00 AM by beckerm13 » Logged

Marty
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« Reply #8 on: February 25, 2009, 08:33:22 PM »

Since there is the battery discussion going on, I'll add a bit regarding my Yaesu/Vertex Standard VX-210.  It came with a rechargeable battery pack and also a battery pack holder in which alkaline batteries could be used. 

That is definitely the best of both worlds and an excellent feature.

I' always charged up the rechargeable pack before flying, but also had the alkaline pack within reach in the aircraft.

Then you and Jason are a much more astute pilot than I am.  Smiley  Since I use my aircraft for business travel that resulted in at least two flights every week for several years, I found that I would always accidentally leave the handheld at home or in the aircraft.  With luggage and a laptop to lug back and forth I long ago abandoned a flight bag and perhaps that is the problem.  I have to force myself to remember the GPS card every 26 days.
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Regards, Peter
ATC Feed:  Syracuse (KSYR), NY
scorpia54
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« Reply #9 on: February 26, 2009, 07:12:53 AM »

any comments on VOR features, good/bad/otherwise?
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KSYR-pjr
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« Reply #10 on: February 26, 2009, 09:27:09 AM »

any comments on VOR features, good/bad/otherwise?

In my opinion that feature is overkill and probably not worth the added cost. 

If you are an active pilot I would instead recommend investing in a handheld GPS, which will take you to the nearest airport if your electrical system goes Tango Uniform, not just a nearby VOR.  If you are not an IFR pilot you don't have to spend top dollar for the Garmin or Bendix/King aviation handhelds.   With a little pre-programming the ones sold for ground-based activities, which are significantly cheaper, would serve as an adequate backup and in my opinion much more powerful than the VOR feature of a handheld radio.

For those of us in the lower 48 states a handheld GPS would also serve double-duty as a device that is capable of directing you to nearby safety in the event of an off-airport landing, assuming the landing is not catastrophic for the occupants.
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Regards, Peter
ATC Feed:  Syracuse (KSYR), NY
Jason
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« Reply #11 on: February 26, 2009, 09:49:10 AM »

I agree with Peter. VOR/CDI is a bit overkill for a handheld transceiver application in my view. In a complete electrical failure, it's awfully difficult to follow an electronic CDI which is rather small. Without an external antenna, signal coverage is also limited.
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scorpia54
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« Reply #12 on: February 28, 2009, 02:34:02 AM »

so something like the garmin 695 would be good? I live in australia would it have all the updates / weather features as the USA 1?
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KSYR-pjr
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« Reply #13 on: February 28, 2009, 09:22:55 AM »

so something like the garmin 695 would be good? I live in australia would it have all the updates / weather features as the USA 1?

The Garmin 695 is probably one of the best but it also is the most costly.   I don't have an answer about what features are available for Australian use, however.  For its price you definitely want to ask Garmin directly about that before purchasing.  Smiley
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Regards, Peter
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scorpia54
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« Reply #14 on: February 28, 2009, 04:42:05 PM »

are the garmin units the best or are there others?
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