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 1 
 on: April 28, 2016, 11:18:09 PM 
Started by GeoffSM1 - Last post by yrp
If you are going to cut / paste text from avherald, it is courteous to give credit.

 2 
 on: April 28, 2016, 10:00:37 PM 
Started by chintao - Last post by chintao
Thank you for the information dave.  Its something to look forward to .

 3 
 on: April 28, 2016, 06:27:57 PM 
Started by GeoffSM1 - Last post by GeoffSM1
A Delta Airlines McDonnell Douglas MD-90, registration N940DN performing flight DL-873 from Atlanta,GA to Miami,FL (USA), was cleared for takeoff from Atlanta's runway 27R. A Delta Airlines McDonnell Douglas MD-88, registration N913DE performing flight DL-749 from Miami,FL to Atlanta,GA (USA), had landed on Atlanta's runway 27L and was taxiing along taxiway T towards the terminal approaching runway 27R (intersection of taxiway T with runway 27R about 3200 meters/10500 feet down the runway). Tower cleared the aircraft to cross runway 27R about 20 seconds after the takeoff clearance for DL-873 had been issued. Another 22 seconds later tower cancelled the takeoff clearance for flight DL-873 prompting the crew to reject takeoff at high speed (about 120 knots over ground). Tower subsequently apologized to DL-873, the aircraft vacated the runway onto taxiway M, tower again apologized stating it was his mistake. The tower controller was relieved from duty thereafter, another controller took charge of the frequency.
A passenger reported the crew of DL-873 announced they had rejected takeoff due to an administrative mistake by air traffic control.

 4 
 on: April 28, 2016, 02:49:02 PM 
Started by VictorAtienza94 - Last post by VictorAtienza94
Not much, but this is all I could get.

There's also a little piece of comms from the "Flight Check 58" that is supossed to be a Learjet 60 calibrator aircraft. Will try to work it as well for the calibration planes post cheesy


 5 
 on: April 28, 2016, 01:46:35 PM 
Started by jdflyer - Last post by tyketto
This is just a curiosity question.  I was just listening to a clip where a pilot did a go-around at KSFO.  The controllers queried the pilot at least 5 times for the reason for the go-around and I have heard this in other clips also.  This pilot finally answered that his approach was too high, fast and unstable.  Exactly why does a controller ask this question?  The pilot felt it was necessary for the safety of the flight would seem to be the answer in most any case.

One reason they ask is because depending on the circumstances, they may need to warn the aircrafts on final behind them of the issue. For example: Let's say that that pilot in question performed the go-around due to a flock of birds on short final, or even at the at the REILs. If the pilot just felt it was necessary and that was his answer, the arrivals behind him may end up in that flock of birds, leading to a blown engine.

Another reason: weather. Wind shear, microburst, severe gains or losses of airspeed on final.. all of those are invisible barriers that aircraft on final nor ATC would be able to see that can cause a pilot to go around. And those are worth giving the caution to other aircraft on final so they can be ready for it.

It's been said before: While pilots are PIC of their aircraft, ATC is in control of the airspace that they are flying in, and need to keep it safe with aircraft properly separated to ensure the safety of the airspace they control. Knowing what happens on a go-around is key to ensuring that safety is upheld.

BL.

 6 
 on: April 28, 2016, 01:43:07 PM 
Started by mdm_boulder - Last post by mdm_boulder
Hello members.....would.it possible for someone to post ATC
Clip for UA2028 arrival in Denver from today.   I was on that
Flight and we did a go around.   Just curious.

First approach around 1120....second at1140ish.

Thanks in advance

MDM

 7 
 on: April 28, 2016, 11:01:36 AM 
Started by superATC - Last post by superATC
https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=hiU4LcBhO44
This is a professional air traffic control simulator running on iPhone or iPad. The main function is to simulate the process of air traffic control of terminal airspace, which focus on the departure and arrival of civil aviation, namely approach control. The runway and flight routes of airspace could be edited swiftly and neatly, so the application could simulate all kinds of approach sector. Thanks to the text to sound engine of iOS, English and Chinese voice is supported in this application to simulate the read back of pilots.

 8 
 on: April 28, 2016, 10:52:31 AM 
Started by semperflyer797 - Last post by TwinkiePilot
Before you posted your clip semperflyer (for which many thanks) I was quite close to posting a similar clip to yours but I held back at the last minute thinking I would see if I could find more of the incident. Next time I came on here you had already started this thread so I got on with other things. However, subsequently, having a bit of time to spare, I decided  to have another look at the archives and the attached clip is the result. I debated whether I should leave out the section you covered but in the end I've left in all I found - from Atlanta Centre transmissions (confirmation of Emergency) through to Ramp.
One thing perhaps someone could explain - why was a different callsign used while the flight was in contact with Departure? The only thing I can think is that there were two aircraft with very similar callsigns on the frequency causing the controllers to use an alternative for one - but that explanation  isn't evident from the clip.

Can't catch the callsign, but the fuel dump sounds like a different aircraft, different problem.

 9 
 on: April 27, 2016, 08:58:14 PM 
Started by jdflyer - Last post by jdflyer
This is just a curiosity question.  I was just listening to a clip where a pilot did a go-around at KSFO.  The controllers queried the pilot at least 5 times for the reason for the go-around and I have heard this in other clips also.  This pilot finally answered that his approach was too high, fast and unstable.  Exactly why does a controller ask this question?  The pilot felt it was necessary for the safety of the flight would seem to be the answer in most any case.

 10 
 on: April 26, 2016, 05:46:53 PM 
Started by GeoffSM1 - Last post by GeoffSM1
A Pakistan Internation Airlines Boeing 777-200, registration AP-BGY performing flight PK-711 from Manchester,EN (UK) to New York JFK,NY (USA) with 205 people on board, was enroute at FL370 over Northern Ireland (UK) about 130nm northeast of Shannon (Ireland) when the crew declared PAN due to a lavatory smoke indication and decided to divert to Shannon.

https://www.aeroinside.com/item/7430/pia-b772-near-shannon-on-apr-23rd-2016-lavatory-smoke-indication

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