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 31 
 on: December 13, 2014, 11:09:35 AM 
Started by LHMCOST - Last post by LHMCOST
HI, I am having troubles again with the IOS app.  It seems only 2 options are available KMCO Tower/APP and Orlando Approach.   

THere used to be many options (single freq.) to monitor which aren't there anymore.  I already deleted and reinstalled the APP but notice it is happening on both my IPOD touch and IPHONE 6.

Thanks

 32 
 on: December 12, 2014, 03:47:54 PM 
Started by fly time - Last post by fly time
KRNT (Renton, WA) is my home airport, and I frequently listen in from home or office.  The last several times I've tuned in I can only hear communication on the ground frequency.  Depending on the staffing and workload in the tower, I believe the outgoing tower frequency transmissions are sometimes also broadcast over the ground frequency (makes it easier for one controller to manage both frequencies).  So what I hear on LiveATC is all communication on the ground frequency (ATC and aircraft), plus ATC transmissions over the tower frequency.  I cannot hear any transmissions from aircraft on the tower frequency.  And when they get busy and have a separate controller working the ground frequency, then only the ground communications are heard.  I know in the past I was able to hear it all, but not over the past month or so.

BTW, love the service!  Keep up the good work  smiley

 33 
 on: December 12, 2014, 10:13:27 AM 
Started by swa4678 - Last post by swa4678
I hope it happened, but that's likely wishful thinking.

Probably happens more often than you might think. I didn't ask Zoem if it did in this case, but either way, you could tell even before switching to ground that the pilot's mood on frequency had softened a bit. I think both sides knew that it was just adrenaline-fueled alertness/energy wearing off after a tense situation (with delays and headaches to follow shortly thereafter).

 34 
 on: December 12, 2014, 10:06:29 AM 
Started by swa4678 - Last post by jbadger10
I get that the pilot was frustrated about having to return to the gate, but there was no need for the attitude toward TWR. Zoem was doing his job and his #1 priority is safety. That pilot should have contacted him after the fact and apologized - I hope it happened, but that's likely wishful thinking.

 35 
 on: December 12, 2014, 04:55:04 AM 
Started by swa4678 - Last post by swa4678
The following is a snippet is taken from an article posted on the FAA's Facebook page entitled Controller Vigilance Pays Safety Dividends at LAX:

Quote
Some people always seem to be looking for trouble. In the case of two controllers at Los Angeles International Airport Control Tower, that’s a very good thing.
 
The controllers, Dennis J. and Zoem P., averted a dangerous situation on one of the airport’s runways just before 1 p.m. on November 19th.
 
A Beechcraft Bonanza had landed on the most northerly runway and was trying to taxi to south of the most southerly runway. Controllers kept a close eye on the aircraft as it crossed one runway and the pilot was instructed to hold short of Runway 25R. The pilot read back the instruction correctly. Then, Local Controller Zoem P. cleared an American Airlines Airbus 321 for takeoff on that same runway.
 
Despite acknowledging the instruction to hold short of Runway 25R, the Bonanza pilot continued taxiing toward the runway at a rapid speed.
 
“When they’re going that fast, we suspect that they think they've been cleared to cross the runway,” said Los Angeles Tower Manager Sherry A.  
 
Dennis J., working the Local Assist position, noticed the Bonanza's speed and notified Zoem, who reacted immediately by telling the Bonanza pilot to stop twice and cancelling the Airbus’ takeoff clearance. The closest proximity between the two aircraft was estimated to be 8,400 feet.

The aircraft involved were AAL12 and N1708W.

I left the beginning of the audio clip (from takeoff clearance through cancelled takeoff clearance) completely unedited; the remainder was edited to truncate silence and irrelevant transmissions (except for one arrival checking in at 1:19... just because I wasn't convinced that pilot was speaking English or any other human-created language).

Poor Zoem, I don't think AAL12 was too happy about the unannounced rejected takeoff practice. Smiley

 36 
 on: December 12, 2014, 04:11:10 AM 
Started by Jetwash - Last post by VitaminO
Would love to see a KSMF tower feed here and on the app

 37 
 on: December 12, 2014, 03:37:24 AM 
Started by DingerX - Last post by DingerX
For those of you who don't have a ton of work in front of you:
It can't be much fun for the controllers in the Bay Area. Yesterday, during a major storm that was already making life difficult for everyone, the winds were shifting. To compensate, a coordinated change of arrival and departure runways at all major airports, was set for (on my guess) 23:00 UTC. For SFO, I think this involved going from landing on 19L/R and taking off on the 10s to sending everything in and out the 28s.
Then at about 22:52 UTC, Virgin America 958 at gate 51B called on Ramp frequency reporting a fire in the back of the aircraft; shortly thereafter an evacuation is mentioned on 121.8. Level 3 alert shenanigans ensue, sending trucks to the gate, and the two on short final go around for an unexpected tour of the region in the finest weather California has to offer. I'd like to post it all up in a coherent way, but with my skills, that would take the better part of a day just to figure out everything that was going on.

 38 
 on: December 11, 2014, 05:01:07 PM 
Started by Golar - Last post by KBED1185
I may be the odd one out, but I do not agree with censoring these type of incidents.  There should certainly be a warning, but deleting and burying them is not a good thing.  This site is all about documenting the day to day activities in the aviation community.  These crashes are a sad, but an absolute reality that every pilot should be aware of every time he steps in the cockpit.  Incidents like these, while disturbing, do happen.  You can not shelter everyone from the world and the unfortunate realities that occur.  Just my two cents of course.

A part of me has to agree with you, bugalou.  In fact, I agreed wholeheartedly at first...

However, having listened to the pilot's final moments in this case, there is absolutely nothing positive that can be gleaned from the recording.  It depicts the painful final seconds of the pilot's life in blood-curdling screams - not exactly a course in aviation education.  In addition, having witnessed the audio recording live in its entirety, I feel that it's important to respect the pilot and his loved ones by offering him the respect of privacy.  I do not believe he intentionally keyed the mic and LiveATC.net is not the end of the road for such clips.  I believe Dave's intention was to make an exception in order to avoid the clip making national headlines, simply out of respect for the victims and their families.

Despite the argument for privacy, I keep returning to the idea that pilots (myself included) frequently overlook the realities of general aviation, as you mentioned.  Incidents like these do happen - indeed quite frequently - and we might all be better off facing realities head-on rather than shying away and opting for "protection".  In my humble opinion, pilots like me have no business being in the air without an intimate understanding of the risks involved, including fatality.

Thanks for sharing your opinion!

 39 
 on: December 11, 2014, 02:50:25 PM 
Started by bugalou - Last post by bugalou
http://money.cnn.com/2014/12/11/news/companies/airbus-super-jumbo-a380/index.html?hpt=hp_c4

I had no idea they were even having an issue selling them.

 40 
 on: December 11, 2014, 12:21:45 PM 
Started by Golar - Last post by bugalou
I may be the odd one out, but I do not agree with censoring these type of incidents.  There should certainly be a warning, but deleting and burying them is not a good thing.  This site is all about documenting the day to day activities in the aviation community.  These crashes are a sad, but an absolute reality that every pilot should be aware of every time he steps in the cockpit.  Incidents like these, while disturbing, do happen.  You can not shelter everyone from the world and the unfortunate realities that occur.  Just my two cents of course.

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