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 71 
 on: April 10, 2014, 10:04:52 AM 
Started by RonR - Last post by joeyb747
Quite a landing by a 767 in a strong crosswind...gotta love those landing gear...great video

http://www.aviationvideos.co/2014/03/767-hard-crosswind-landing.html?m=1

WOW! Nice one!! Thanks for sharing this Ron!  afro

 72 
 on: April 10, 2014, 07:31:37 AM 
Started by RonR - Last post by RonR
Quite a landing by a 767 in a strong crosswind...gotta love those landing gear...great video

http://www.aviationvideos.co/2014/03/767-hard-crosswind-landing.html?m=1

 73 
 on: April 09, 2014, 03:18:55 PM 
Started by mcfly777 - Last post by mcfly777
Thank you very much for clearing this up. I fly a lot, but in all these years hadn't experienced an aborted landing, and it was concerning to see this B767 so close to us. Good to know that it's not that uncommon an occurrence.

thanks again.

 74 
 on: April 09, 2014, 02:25:50 PM 
Started by frcabot - Last post by InterpreDemon
He was 19 miles out on approach, looking at the temperature and spread on the ground at the destination it's pretty safe to assume he was picking up a load of ice at altitude in light rain and clouds, was probably flying on autopilot and didn't notice the incremental changes in trim and handling, and by the time the AP couldn't manage it anymore and disengaged he was in command of an essentially unflyable machine. He also had four passengers and probably luggage, so W&B may have been a factor re spin recovery... plus the fact that nobody has been trained in actual spin recovery for the last few decades. Even back in the 80's I had to strap on a chute and take an aerobatics course in order to get mine.

 75 
 on: April 09, 2014, 02:02:51 PM 
Started by frcabot - Last post by frcabot
Preliminary NTSB report is out. http://www.ntsb.gov/aviationquery/brief.aspx?ev_id=20140322X03239&key=1

Apparently pilot communicated to ATC that plane was in a spin. No further details. Best guess is pilot-error (i.e. failure to maintain proper airspeed and failure to apply proper spin recovery) and/or icing changing the stall characteristics of the airplane (and requiring a higher airspeed). Possibly also tail stall which can occur in icing conditions when flaps are deployed or airspeed is reduced (but tail stall speed is far higher than wing stall speed).

 76 
 on: April 09, 2014, 01:55:20 PM 
Started by jvnanu - Last post by RonR
Thanks tyketto, that makes perfect sense. Thanks for clearing that up Smiley

Sent from my SGH-M919 using Tapatalk

 77 
 on: April 09, 2014, 01:26:36 PM 
Started by jvnanu - Last post by tyketto
Someone correct me if I'm wrong, but I think it may depend on where you would be crossing the runway.  If you're closer to the 15R end of the runway, you'd be told to cross runway 15L and, vice versa, if you're closer to the 33R end you'd be told to cross 33R.  I've also heard pilots being told to cross 15L/33R...

It should be whichever runway is ACTIVE. If you're at the end of 15L/33R, and the 15s are being used, you should be told to cross runway 15L.

think about it this way. If the 15s are active, and ATC told you "XXX123, traffic holding in position, cross runway 33R", and you cross and look down to the approach end to runway 33R, chances are that you probably aren't going to see any traffic down there, because the 15s are being used for arrivals and departures.

They may use both names for the runway for clarity, but it shouldn't be because the pilot is closer to one end of the runway than the other.

BL.

 78 
 on: April 09, 2014, 01:14:10 PM 
Started by dave - Last post by dave
This feed is going away on Friday since the feed provider can no longer provide the feed.  If anyone in las Vegas can help please let me know.

 79 
 on: April 09, 2014, 12:07:23 PM 
Started by av8tor172 - Last post by av8tor172
Once again I find myself playing with the Raspberry Pi and put together another "How-To" article walking you through step-by-step on how you can turn your Raspberry Pi computer into an FM transmitter.

One big use I've discovered immediately for this project is to listen to LiveATC.net ATC streams as well as my own MilAirComms.com military streams anywhere in my home on an FM radio.

You can access my How-To article as well as watch a video of my working system here:
http://milaircomms.com/raspberry_pi_fm_transmitter.html

Hope you enjoy.
Thanks
George
www.MilAirComms.com

 80 
 on: April 09, 2014, 11:57:31 AM 
Started by leiar - Last post by RonR
Patience sir, patience  smiley

Yes, you are correct that it would be 10:00 UTC.  I found you're flight in the archives.  I could hear the flight calling the tower and a minute or two later it was given clearance to land.  But after that there was no mention of a go-around or missed approach.  The feed scans more than one frequency so it's possible that the feed was on another frequency when KLM1352 was told to go-around.  I checked both EHAM tower feeds and heard nothing about a go-around on either one.  The feeds were probably on a different frequency when this happened.

Ron

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